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Title: Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles

Abstract

The development of porosity at 1000 C in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing ultra-fine oxide particles with diameters on the order of a few nm is investigated. A comparison with an alloy fabricated by internal oxidation demonstrates that the porosity formation is associated with mechanical alloying with Y2O3 in argon. The pores grow in spite of a sub-micron grain size suggesting that the grain boundaries are not effective paths for removing entrapped gas from the pores.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. Ohio State University
  3. Otto-von-Guericke Universitat, Magdeburg, Germany
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shared Research Equipment Collaborative Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
935177
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Scripta Materialia; Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; IRON BASE ALLOYS; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; GRAIN SIZE; POROSITY; DISPERSION HARDENING; YTTRIUM OXIDES; PORE STRUCTURE; Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS); Porosity; Density; Grain Growth

Citation Formats

Schneibel, Joachim H, Liu, Chain T, Hoelzer, David T, Mills, Michael J., Sarosi, P. M., Hayashi, Taisuke, Wendt, Ullrich, and Heyse, Hartmut. Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2007.07.029.
Schneibel, Joachim H, Liu, Chain T, Hoelzer, David T, Mills, Michael J., Sarosi, P. M., Hayashi, Taisuke, Wendt, Ullrich, & Heyse, Hartmut. Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2007.07.029.
Schneibel, Joachim H, Liu, Chain T, Hoelzer, David T, Mills, Michael J., Sarosi, P. M., Hayashi, Taisuke, Wendt, Ullrich, and Heyse, Hartmut. Mon . "Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2007.07.029.
@article{osti_935177,
title = {Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles},
author = {Schneibel, Joachim H and Liu, Chain T and Hoelzer, David T and Mills, Michael J. and Sarosi, P. M. and Hayashi, Taisuke and Wendt, Ullrich and Heyse, Hartmut},
abstractNote = {The development of porosity at 1000 C in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing ultra-fine oxide particles with diameters on the order of a few nm is investigated. A comparison with an alloy fabricated by internal oxidation demonstrates that the porosity formation is associated with mechanical alloying with Y2O3 in argon. The pores grow in spite of a sub-micron grain size suggesting that the grain boundaries are not effective paths for removing entrapped gas from the pores.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scriptamat.2007.07.029},
journal = {Scripta Materialia},
number = 11,
volume = 57,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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