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Title: Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.

Abstract

The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Intel Corp.
OSTI Identifier:
932939
Report Number(s):
ANL-MCS-CPH-06/56
TRN: US200814%%681
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
97; 42 ENGINEERING; H CODES; HYDRODYNAMICS; LASER-PRODUCED PLASMA; RADIATION TRANSPORT; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; HEAT TRANSFER; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; FABRICATION

Citation Formats

Sizyuk, V., Hassanein, A., Morozov, V., Sizyuk, T., and Mathematics and Computer Science. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/932939.
Sizyuk, V., Hassanein, A., Morozov, V., Sizyuk, T., & Mathematics and Computer Science. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.. United States. doi:10.2172/932939.
Sizyuk, V., Hassanein, A., Morozov, V., Sizyuk, T., and Mathematics and Computer Science. Tue . "Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.". United States. doi:10.2172/932939. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/932939.
@article{osti_932939,
title = {Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.},
author = {Sizyuk, V. and Hassanein, A. and Morozov, V. and Sizyuk, T. and Mathematics and Computer Science},
abstractNote = {The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.},
doi = {10.2172/932939},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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