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Title: Strains, stresses and elastic properties in polycrystallinemetallic thin films: in situ deformation combined with x-ray diffractionand simulation experiments

Abstract

X-ray diffraction is used in combination with tensiletesting for measuring elastic properties of metallic thin films. Sizeeffect, elastic anisotropy and grain morphologies are considered in allthese experiments and supported by different kind of numericalsimulations operating at different length scales. Such instrumentalstudies are time consuming even if synchrotron sources are used. Newexperiments are under progress for reducing acquisition data andimproving precision on strain measurements. After introducing briefly themain principles and results of our techniques, first promisingmeasurements on nanometric W/Cu multilayers using 2D CCD detectors andhigh monochromatic flux at the Advanced Light Source Berkeley (USA) onbeam line 11.3.1 are presented. In addition, simulation experiments foranalyzing elasticity in textured gold film are discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
COLLABORATION - U.Poitiers/France
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
932790
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62842
R&D Project: A580ES; BnR: KC0204016
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Science Forum; Journal Volume: 524-525; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Elasticity thin films size effects diffraction synchrotrontensile testing simulation

Citation Formats

Goudeau, P., Faurie, D., Girault, B., Renault, P.-O., Le Bourhis,E., Villain, P., Badawi, F., Castelnau, O., Brenner, R., Bechade, J.-L., Geandier, G., and Tamura, N. Strains, stresses and elastic properties in polycrystallinemetallic thin films: in situ deformation combined with x-ray diffractionand simulation experiments. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.524-525.735.
Goudeau, P., Faurie, D., Girault, B., Renault, P.-O., Le Bourhis,E., Villain, P., Badawi, F., Castelnau, O., Brenner, R., Bechade, J.-L., Geandier, G., & Tamura, N. Strains, stresses and elastic properties in polycrystallinemetallic thin films: in situ deformation combined with x-ray diffractionand simulation experiments. United States. doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.524-525.735.
Goudeau, P., Faurie, D., Girault, B., Renault, P.-O., Le Bourhis,E., Villain, P., Badawi, F., Castelnau, O., Brenner, R., Bechade, J.-L., Geandier, G., and Tamura, N. Sun . "Strains, stresses and elastic properties in polycrystallinemetallic thin films: in situ deformation combined with x-ray diffractionand simulation experiments". United States. doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.524-525.735.
@article{osti_932790,
title = {Strains, stresses and elastic properties in polycrystallinemetallic thin films: in situ deformation combined with x-ray diffractionand simulation experiments},
author = {Goudeau, P. and Faurie, D. and Girault, B. and Renault, P.-O. and Le Bourhis,E. and Villain, P. and Badawi, F. and Castelnau, O. and Brenner, R. and Bechade, J.-L. and Geandier, G. and Tamura, N.},
abstractNote = {X-ray diffraction is used in combination with tensiletesting for measuring elastic properties of metallic thin films. Sizeeffect, elastic anisotropy and grain morphologies are considered in allthese experiments and supported by different kind of numericalsimulations operating at different length scales. Such instrumentalstudies are time consuming even if synchrotron sources are used. Newexperiments are under progress for reducing acquisition data andimproving precision on strain measurements. After introducing briefly themain principles and results of our techniques, first promisingmeasurements on nanometric W/Cu multilayers using 2D CCD detectors andhigh monochromatic flux at the Advanced Light Source Berkeley (USA) onbeam line 11.3.1 are presented. In addition, simulation experiments foranalyzing elasticity in textured gold film are discussed.},
doi = {10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.524-525.735},
journal = {Materials Science Forum},
number = ,
volume = 524-525,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • Grazing-incidence, wide-angle x-ray scattering measurements were conducted on indium oxide thin films grown on silica substrates via pulsed laser deposition. Growth temperatures (T G) in this study ranged from -50 °C to 600 °C, in order to investigate the thermal effects on the film structure and its spatial homogeneity, as well as their relationship to electrical properties. Films grown below room temperature were amorphous, while films prepared at T G = 25 °C and above crystallized in the cubic bixbyite structure, and their crystalline fraction increased with deposition temperature. The electrical conductivity (σ) and electrical mobility (μ) were strongly enhancedmore » at low deposition temperatures. For T G = 25 °C and 50 °C, a strong < 100 > preferred orientation (texture) occurred, but it decreased as the deposition temperature, and consequential crystallinity, increased. Higher variations in texture coefficients and in lattice parameters were measured at the film surface compared to the interior of the film, indicating strong microstructural gradients. At low crystallinity, the in-plane lattice spacing expanded, while the out-of-plane spacing contracted, and those values merged at T G = 400 °C, where high μ was measured. This directional difference in lattice spacing, or deviatoric strain, was linear as a function of both deposition temperature and the degree of crystallinity. The crystalline sample with T G = 100 °C had the lowest mobility, as well as film diffraction peaks which split into doublets. The deviatoric strains from these doublet peaks differ by a factor of four, supporting the presence of both a microstructure and strain gradient in this film. More isotropic films exhibit larger l values, indicating that the microstructure directly correlates with electrical properties. Lastly, these results provide valuable insights that can help to improve the desirable properties of indium oxide, as well as other transparent conducting oxides.« less