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Title: The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. University of Heidelberg
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
932197
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Molecular Biology; Journal Volume: 367; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Mesentean, Sidonia, Koppole, Sampath, Smith, Jeremy C, and Fischer, S. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2006.12.058.
Mesentean, Sidonia, Koppole, Sampath, Smith, Jeremy C, & Fischer, S. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2006.12.058.
Mesentean, Sidonia, Koppole, Sampath, Smith, Jeremy C, and Fischer, S. Mon . "The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2006.12.058.
@article{osti_932197,
title = {The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.},
author = {Mesentean, Sidonia and Koppole, Sampath and Smith, Jeremy C and Fischer, S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jmb.2006.12.058},
journal = {Journal of Molecular Biology},
number = 2,
volume = 367,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by 60{sup o}. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a seesaw motionmore » of the relay helix, followed by a piston-like motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery-stroke by using principal component analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large-amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the seesaw motion of the relay helix dominates in the dynamics of the pre-recovery stroke structure, but not in the dynamics of the post-recovery stroke structure, and vice versa for the piston motion of the SH1 helix. This is consistent with the order of the proposed two-phase model for the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke. Molecular movies of these principal motions are available at http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/groups/biocomp/fischer.« less
  • Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by {approx}60 degrees. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin's ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a see-saw motionmore » of the relay helix, followed by a piston/seesaw motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery stroke by using Principal Component Analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions.« less
  • Before the myosin motor head can perform the next power stroke, it undergoes a large conformational transition in which the converter domain, bearing the lever arm, rotates {approx} 65{sup o}. Simultaneous with this 'recovery stroke', myosin activates its ATPase function by closing the Switch-2 loop over the bound ATP. This coupling between the motions of the converter domain and of the 40 {angstrom}-distant Switch-2 loop is essential to avoid unproductive ATP hydrolysis. The coupling mechanism is determined here by finding a series of optimized intermediates between crystallographic end structures of the recovery stroke (Dictyostelium discoideum), yielding movies of the transitionmore » at atomic detail. The successive formation of two hydrogen bonds by the Switch-2 loop is correlated with the successive see-saw motions of the relay and SH1 helices that hold the converter domain. SH1 helix and Switch-2 loop communicate via a highly conserved loop that wedges against the SH1-helix upon Switch-2 closing.« less