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Title: Interdependent Risk in Interacting Infrastructure Systems

Abstract

Critical infrastructures display many of the characteristic properties of complex systems. They exhibit infrequent large failures events that often obey a power law distribution in their probability versus size. This power law behavior suggests that conventional risk analysis does not apply to these systems. It is thought that some of this behavior comes from different parts of the systems interacting with each other both in space and time. While these complex infrastructure systems can exhibit these characteristics on their own, in reality these individual infrastructure systems interact with each other in even more complicated ways. This interaction can lead to increased or decreased risk of failure in the individual systems. To investigate this, we couple two complex system models and investigate the effect of the coupling on the characteristic properties of the systems such as the probability distribution of events.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Alaska
  3. University of Wisconsin, Madison
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
932146
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 40th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS'07), Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA, 20070103, 20070106
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Carreras, Benjamin A, Newman, David E, Gradney, Paul, Lynch, Vickie E, and Dobson, Ian. Interdependent Risk in Interacting Infrastructure Systems. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2007.285.
Carreras, Benjamin A, Newman, David E, Gradney, Paul, Lynch, Vickie E, & Dobson, Ian. Interdependent Risk in Interacting Infrastructure Systems. United States. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2007.285.
Carreras, Benjamin A, Newman, David E, Gradney, Paul, Lynch, Vickie E, and Dobson, Ian. Mon . "Interdependent Risk in Interacting Infrastructure Systems". United States. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2007.285.
@article{osti_932146,
title = {Interdependent Risk in Interacting Infrastructure Systems},
author = {Carreras, Benjamin A and Newman, David E and Gradney, Paul and Lynch, Vickie E and Dobson, Ian},
abstractNote = {Critical infrastructures display many of the characteristic properties of complex systems. They exhibit infrequent large failures events that often obey a power law distribution in their probability versus size. This power law behavior suggests that conventional risk analysis does not apply to these systems. It is thought that some of this behavior comes from different parts of the systems interacting with each other both in space and time. While these complex infrastructure systems can exhibit these characteristics on their own, in reality these individual infrastructure systems interact with each other in even more complicated ways. This interaction can lead to increased or decreased risk of failure in the individual systems. To investigate this, we couple two complex system models and investigate the effect of the coupling on the characteristic properties of the systems such as the probability distribution of events.},
doi = {10.1109/HICSS.2007.285},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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