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Title: Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mouse Genetics Research Facility
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
932105
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nanotoxicology; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Single-walled carbon nanohorns; nanotoxicology; aspiration; inflammatory

Citation Formats

Lynch, Rachel M, Voy, Brynn H, Glass-Mattie, Dana F, Mahurin, Shannon Mark, Saxton, Arnold, Donnel, Robert L., and Cheng, Mengdawn. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/17435390701598496.
Lynch, Rachel M, Voy, Brynn H, Glass-Mattie, Dana F, Mahurin, Shannon Mark, Saxton, Arnold, Donnel, Robert L., & Cheng, Mengdawn. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns. United States. doi:10.1080/17435390701598496.
Lynch, Rachel M, Voy, Brynn H, Glass-Mattie, Dana F, Mahurin, Shannon Mark, Saxton, Arnold, Donnel, Robert L., and Cheng, Mengdawn. Mon . "Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns". United States. doi:10.1080/17435390701598496.
@article{osti_932105,
title = {Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns},
author = {Lynch, Rachel M and Voy, Brynn H and Glass-Mattie, Dana F and Mahurin, Shannon Mark and Saxton, Arnold and Donnel, Robert L. and Cheng, Mengdawn},
abstractNote = {Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.},
doi = {10.1080/17435390701598496},
journal = {Nanotoxicology},
number = 2,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes inmore » gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.« less
  • Reflecting their exceptional potential to advance a range of biomedical, aeronautic, and other industrial products, carbon nanotube (CNT) production, and the potential for human exposure to aerosolized CNT’s, is increasing. CNT’s have toxicologically significant structural and chemical similarities to asbestos, and have repeatedly been shown to cause pulmonary inflammation, granuloma formation and fibrosis after inhalation/instillation/aspiration exposure in rodents, a pattern of effects similar to those observed following exposure to asbestos. To determine the degree to which responses to SWCNT and asbestos are similar or different, the pulmonary response of C57BL/6 mice to repeated exposure to SWCNT, crocidolite asbestos and ultrafinemore » carbon black (UFCB) were compared using high-throughput global HPLC-FTICR-MS proteomics, histopathology and BAL cytokine analyses. Mice were exposed to material suspensions (40 μg/mouse) twice a week, for 3 weeks by pharyngeal aspiration. Histologically, the incidence and severity of inflammatory and fibrotic responses were greatest in mice treated with SWCNT. SWCNT treatment affected the greatest changes in abundance of identified lung tissue proteins. The trend in number of proteins affected (SWCNT (376)>asbestos (231)>UFCB (184)) followed the potency of these materials in 3 biochemical assays of inflammation (cytokines). SWCNT treatment uniquely affected the abundance of 109 proteins, but these proteins largely represent cellular processes affected by asbestos treatment as well, further evidence of broad similarity in the tissue-level response to asbestos and SWCNT. Two high sensitivity markers of inflammation, one (S100a9) observed in humans exposed to asbestos, were found and may be promising biomarkers of human response to SWCNT exposure.« less
  • A high-speed vibration milling (HSVM) method was applied to synthesize water dispersible single- walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs). Highly reactive free radicals (HOOCCH2CH2 ) produced from an acyl peroxide under HSVM conditions react with hydrophobic SWNHs to produce a highly water dispersible derivative (f-SWNHs), which has been characterized in detail by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques together with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scatter- ing (DLS). The carboxylic acid functionalized, water-dispersible SWNHs material are versatile precursors that have potential applications in the biomedical area.
  • Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) are new carbonaceous materials. In this paper, we report the first successful preparation of SWNHs encapsulating trimetallic nitride template endohedral metallofullerenes (TNT-EMFs). The resultant materials were functionalized by a high-speed vibration milling method and conjugated with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The successful encapsulation of TNT-EMFs and external functionalization with QDs provide a dual diagnostic platform for in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications of these new carbonaceous materials.
  • Nanoparticles have significant potential as selective photo-absorbing agents for laser based cancer treatment. This study investigates the use of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as thermal enhancers when excited by near infrared (NIR) light for tumor cell destruction. Absorption spectra of SWNHs in deionized water at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.085, and 0.1 mg/ml were measured using a spectrophotometer for the wavelength range of 200-1,400 nm. Mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using spectrophotometer transmittance data. Cell culture media containing 0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml SWNHs was laser irradiated at 1,064 nm wavelength with an irradiance of 40more » W/cm{sup 2} for 0-5 minutes. Temperature elevations of these solutions during laser irradiation were measured with a thermocouple 8 mm away from the incident laser beam. Cell viability of murine kidney cancer cells (RENCA) was measured 24 hours following laser treatment with the previously mentioned laser parameters alone or with SWNHs. Cell viability as a function of radial position was determined qualitatively using trypan blue staining and bright field microscopy for samples exposed to heating durations of 2 and 6 minutes alone or with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs. A Beckman Coulter Vi-Cell instrument quantified cell viability of samples treated with varying SWNH concentration (0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml) and heating durations of 0-6 minutes. Spectrophotometer measurements indicated inclusion of SWNHs increased light absorption and attenuation across all wavelengths. Utilizing SWNHs with laser irradiation increased temperature elevation compared to laser heating alone. Greater absorption and higher temperature elevations were observed with increasing SWNH concentration. No inherent toxicity was observed with SWNH inclusion. A more rapid and substantial viability decline was observed over time in samples exposed to SWNHs with laser treatment compared with samples experiencing laser heating or SWNH treatment alone. Samples heated for 6 minutes with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs demonstrated increasing viability as the radial distance from the incident laser beam increased. The significant increases in absorption, temperature elevation, and cell death with inclusion of SWNHs in laser therapy demonstrate the potential of their use as agents for enhancing photothermal tumor destruction.« less