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Title: PortSim - A Port Security Simulation and Visualization Tool

Abstract

Around the world, there is great concern about the movement of threat materials using seaport shipping containers. The benefits of early detection of weapons of mass destruction is obvious. However, the inspection process needs to be conducted in such a way as to not unreasonably impede normal commerce. Prior to actual deployment of new detection systems, policies, or procedures, it is useful to construct an operational and economic model of the port facility and to run simulations to gage the impact. Using a simulation model beforehand aids decision makers in evaluating trade-offs. PortSim was developed at ORNL by the author to allow a user to investigate a number of parameters in order to see the impact on port operations and cost. It consolidates a conceptual operations model, cost information, policy and procedures database, a real-time data acquisition capability, and information flow tracking and provides a visualization of port operations in a geospatial environment. This paper describes the use of PortSim to simulate and visualize a typical port.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
932089
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 41st. Annual IEEE International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology, Ottawa, Canada, 20071008, 20071011
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Port Security; Container Inspection; Visual Simulation; Operations Research; Enterprise Modeling

Citation Formats

Koch, Daniel B. PortSim - A Port Security Simulation and Visualization Tool. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/CCST.2007.4373477.
Koch, Daniel B. PortSim - A Port Security Simulation and Visualization Tool. United States. doi:10.1109/CCST.2007.4373477.
Koch, Daniel B. Mon . "PortSim - A Port Security Simulation and Visualization Tool". United States. doi:10.1109/CCST.2007.4373477.
@article{osti_932089,
title = {PortSim - A Port Security Simulation and Visualization Tool},
author = {Koch, Daniel B},
abstractNote = {Around the world, there is great concern about the movement of threat materials using seaport shipping containers. The benefits of early detection of weapons of mass destruction is obvious. However, the inspection process needs to be conducted in such a way as to not unreasonably impede normal commerce. Prior to actual deployment of new detection systems, policies, or procedures, it is useful to construct an operational and economic model of the port facility and to run simulations to gage the impact. Using a simulation model beforehand aids decision makers in evaluating trade-offs. PortSim was developed at ORNL by the author to allow a user to investigate a number of parameters in order to see the impact on port operations and cost. It consolidates a conceptual operations model, cost information, policy and procedures database, a real-time data acquisition capability, and information flow tracking and provides a visualization of port operations in a geospatial environment. This paper describes the use of PortSim to simulate and visualize a typical port.},
doi = {10.1109/CCST.2007.4373477},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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