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Title: MHD Models of Stellar Core Collapse with GenASiS

Abstract

We present magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of stellar core collapse computed with our astrophysical MHD code GenASiS. Microphysics in the models include a realistic equation of state and a simple parametrization of deleptionization during collapse. We give a brief description of some numerical results, and discuss requirements for capturing the physics of the magnetorotational instability in the context of core collapse supernovae.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
932085
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)2007, Boston, MA, USA, 20070625, 20070628
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; INSTABILITY; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; PHYSICS; SUPERNOVAE; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Endeve, Eirik, Cardall, Christian Y, Budiardja, R. D., and Mezzacappa, Anthony. MHD Models of Stellar Core Collapse with GenASiS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Endeve, Eirik, Cardall, Christian Y, Budiardja, R. D., & Mezzacappa, Anthony. MHD Models of Stellar Core Collapse with GenASiS. United States.
Endeve, Eirik, Cardall, Christian Y, Budiardja, R. D., and Mezzacappa, Anthony. Mon . "MHD Models of Stellar Core Collapse with GenASiS". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_932085,
title = {MHD Models of Stellar Core Collapse with GenASiS},
author = {Endeve, Eirik and Cardall, Christian Y and Budiardja, R. D. and Mezzacappa, Anthony},
abstractNote = {We present magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of stellar core collapse computed with our astrophysical MHD code GenASiS. Microphysics in the models include a realistic equation of state and a simple parametrization of deleptionization during collapse. We give a brief description of some numerical results, and discuss requirements for capturing the physics of the magnetorotational instability in the context of core collapse supernovae.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • The results of a detailed numerical calculation of the collapse of the iron core of a 15 solar mass star at the end of its normal evolution are presented. The model discussed is derived from Wilson (1978) with changes in the equation of state, the electron capture model and a complete proper treatment of neutrino degeneracy. The effect of the new equation of state is to allow the collapse to proceed to about twice nuclear density before bounce occurs, and much higher infall velocities are realized. Attention is given to the temperature and entropy of the central zone as functionsmore » of the central density during the initial infall to velocity profiles before and after bounce and to the neutronization wave.« less
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