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Title: The Wal-Mart Experience, Part Two

Abstract

In 2005, Wal-Mart opened major experimental stores in McKinney, Texas, and Aurora, Colo. These two stores incorporate several experiments using recycled materials and energy-saving technologies. Over the three-year period from 2006-2008, the performance of the experiments will be evaluated and lessons learned generated. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is monitoring the Colorado stores, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is monitoring the Texas stores. The construction and evaluation of these stores are part of a commitment to sustainability by Wal-Mart. The evaluation also includes monitoring typical Wal-Mart supercenters for a reference case in close proximity to the experimental stores.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Building Technologies Research and Integration Center
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
932048
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ASHRAE Journal; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; COLORADO; CONSTRUCTION; EVALUATION; MONITORING; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; ORNL; PERFORMANCE; TEXAS; Wal-Mart; McKinney; Aurora; energy saving; daylighting

Citation Formats

Deru, Michael, and MacDonald, J Michael. The Wal-Mart Experience, Part Two. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Deru, Michael, & MacDonald, J Michael. The Wal-Mart Experience, Part Two. United States.
Deru, Michael, and MacDonald, J Michael. Mon . "The Wal-Mart Experience, Part Two". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_932048,
title = {The Wal-Mart Experience, Part Two},
author = {Deru, Michael and MacDonald, J Michael},
abstractNote = {In 2005, Wal-Mart opened major experimental stores in McKinney, Texas, and Aurora, Colo. These two stores incorporate several experiments using recycled materials and energy-saving technologies. Over the three-year period from 2006-2008, the performance of the experiments will be evaluated and lessons learned generated. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is monitoring the Colorado stores, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is monitoring the Texas stores. The construction and evaluation of these stores are part of a commitment to sustainability by Wal-Mart. The evaluation also includes monitoring typical Wal-Mart supercenters for a reference case in close proximity to the experimental stores.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASHRAE Journal},
number = 10,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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  • In 2005, Wal-Mart opened experimental stores in McKinney, Texas (hot climate), and Aurora, Colo. (cold climate). With these projects Wal-Mart can: (1)Learn how to achieve sustainability improvements, (2)Gain experience with the design, design process, and operations for some specific advanced technologies, (3)Understand energy use patterns in their stores more clearly, (4)Lay groundwork for better understanding of how to achieve major carbon footprint reductions; and (5)Measure the potential benefits of specific technologies tested.
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