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Title: Competitive formation of glasses and glass-matrix composites

Abstract

By systematically investigating the effect of chemical composition on the competitive formation of glasses in various systems, we attempt to address two long-standing scientific puzzles upon metallic glasses, i.e., (i) which composition is the best for forming glasses and glass-matrix composites and (ii) what determines the easy glass-forming composition range in a given alloy system. Our findings have led to the construction of a qualitative microstructure selection map, which is useful for guiding the design of bulkier metallic glasses and glass-matrix composites. In addition, our analysis demonstrates that the classical kinetic treatment of glass formation is insufficient; to analyze glass formation properly, it is necessary to go beyond simple assumptions of single polymorphic solidification during crystallization.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Wisconsin, Madison
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931952
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Intermetallics; Journal Volume: 15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOY SYSTEMS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; CONSTRUCTION; CRYSTALLIZATION; DESIGN; GLASS; KINETICS; METALLIC GLASSES; MICROSTRUCTURE; SOLIDIFICATION; COMPOSITE MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Lu, Zhao Ping, Ma, D., Liu, Chain T, and Chang, Y. Austin. Competitive formation of glasses and glass-matrix composites. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.intermet.2006.05.015.
Lu, Zhao Ping, Ma, D., Liu, Chain T, & Chang, Y. Austin. Competitive formation of glasses and glass-matrix composites. United States. doi:10.1016/j.intermet.2006.05.015.
Lu, Zhao Ping, Ma, D., Liu, Chain T, and Chang, Y. Austin. Mon . "Competitive formation of glasses and glass-matrix composites". United States. doi:10.1016/j.intermet.2006.05.015.
@article{osti_931952,
title = {Competitive formation of glasses and glass-matrix composites},
author = {Lu, Zhao Ping and Ma, D. and Liu, Chain T and Chang, Y. Austin},
abstractNote = {By systematically investigating the effect of chemical composition on the competitive formation of glasses in various systems, we attempt to address two long-standing scientific puzzles upon metallic glasses, i.e., (i) which composition is the best for forming glasses and glass-matrix composites and (ii) what determines the easy glass-forming composition range in a given alloy system. Our findings have led to the construction of a qualitative microstructure selection map, which is useful for guiding the design of bulkier metallic glasses and glass-matrix composites. In addition, our analysis demonstrates that the classical kinetic treatment of glass formation is insufficient; to analyze glass formation properly, it is necessary to go beyond simple assumptions of single polymorphic solidification during crystallization.},
doi = {10.1016/j.intermet.2006.05.015},
journal = {Intermetallics},
number = ,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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