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Title: Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing

Abstract

A systematic nanoelectrode-gated electron-tunneling molecular-detection concept with potential for rapid DNA sequencing has recently been invented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A DNA molecule is a polymer that typically contains four different types of nucleotide bases: adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) on its phosphate-deoxyribose chain. According to the nanoelectrode-gated molecular-detection concept, it should be possible to obtain genetic sequence information by probing through a DNA molecule base by base at a nanometer scale, as if looking at a strip of movie film. The nanoscale reading of DNA sequences is envisioned to take place at a nanogap (gate) defined by a pair of nanoelectrode tips as a DNA molecule moves through the gate base by base. The rationale is that sample molecules, such as the four different nucleotide bases, each with a distinct chemical composition and structure, should produce a specific perturbation effect on the tunneling electron beam across the two nanoelectrode tips. A sample molecule could thus be detected when it enters the gate. This nanoscience-based approach could lead to a new DNA sequencing technology that could be thousands of times faster than the current technology (Sanger's 'dideoxy' protocol-based capillary electrophoresis systems). Both computational andmore » experimental studies are underway at ORNL towards demonstrating this nanotechnology concept.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
931919
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ChinaNano 2005 (China International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology), Beijing, China, 20050609, 20050611
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; DETECTION; DNA; DNA SEQUENCING; ELECTRON BEAMS; NANOSTRUCTURES

Citation Formats

Lee, James Weifu. Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Lee, James Weifu. Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing. United States.
Lee, James Weifu. Mon . "Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931919,
title = {Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing},
author = {Lee, James Weifu},
abstractNote = {A systematic nanoelectrode-gated electron-tunneling molecular-detection concept with potential for rapid DNA sequencing has recently been invented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A DNA molecule is a polymer that typically contains four different types of nucleotide bases: adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) on its phosphate-deoxyribose chain. According to the nanoelectrode-gated molecular-detection concept, it should be possible to obtain genetic sequence information by probing through a DNA molecule base by base at a nanometer scale, as if looking at a strip of movie film. The nanoscale reading of DNA sequences is envisioned to take place at a nanogap (gate) defined by a pair of nanoelectrode tips as a DNA molecule moves through the gate base by base. The rationale is that sample molecules, such as the four different nucleotide bases, each with a distinct chemical composition and structure, should produce a specific perturbation effect on the tunneling electron beam across the two nanoelectrode tips. A sample molecule could thus be detected when it enters the gate. This nanoscience-based approach could lead to a new DNA sequencing technology that could be thousands of times faster than the current technology (Sanger's 'dideoxy' protocol-based capillary electrophoresis systems). Both computational and experimental studies are underway at ORNL towards demonstrating this nanotechnology concept.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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