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Title: Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing

Abstract

A systematic nanoelectrode-gated electron-tunneling molecular-detection concept with potential for rapid DNA sequencing has recently been invented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A DNA molecule is a polymer that typically contains four different types of nucleotide bases: adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) on its phosphate-deoxyribose chain. According to the nanoelectrode-gated molecular-detection concept, it should be possible to obtain genetic sequence information by probing through a DNA molecule base by base at a nanometer scale, as if looking at a strip of movie film. The nanoscale reading of DNA sequences is envisioned to take place at a nanogap (gate) defined by a pair of nanoelectrode tips as a DNA molecule moves through the gate base by base. The rationale is that sample molecules, such as the four different nucleotide bases, each with a distinct chemical composition and structure, should produce a specific perturbation effect on the tunneling electron beam across the two nanoelectrode tips. A sample molecule could thus be detected when it enters the gate. This nanoscience-based approach could lead to a new DNA sequencing technology that could be thousands of times faster than the current technology (Sanger's 'dideoxy' protocol-based capillary electrophoresis systems). Both computational andmore » experimental studies are underway at ORNL towards demonstrating this nanotechnology concept.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
931919
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ChinaNano 2005 (China International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology), Beijing, China, 20050609, 20050611
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; DETECTION; DNA; DNA SEQUENCING; ELECTRON BEAMS; NANOSTRUCTURES

Citation Formats

Lee, James Weifu. Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Lee, James Weifu. Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing. United States.
Lee, James Weifu. Mon . "Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931919,
title = {Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing},
author = {Lee, James Weifu},
abstractNote = {A systematic nanoelectrode-gated electron-tunneling molecular-detection concept with potential for rapid DNA sequencing has recently been invented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A DNA molecule is a polymer that typically contains four different types of nucleotide bases: adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) on its phosphate-deoxyribose chain. According to the nanoelectrode-gated molecular-detection concept, it should be possible to obtain genetic sequence information by probing through a DNA molecule base by base at a nanometer scale, as if looking at a strip of movie film. The nanoscale reading of DNA sequences is envisioned to take place at a nanogap (gate) defined by a pair of nanoelectrode tips as a DNA molecule moves through the gate base by base. The rationale is that sample molecules, such as the four different nucleotide bases, each with a distinct chemical composition and structure, should produce a specific perturbation effect on the tunneling electron beam across the two nanoelectrode tips. A sample molecule could thus be detected when it enters the gate. This nanoscience-based approach could lead to a new DNA sequencing technology that could be thousands of times faster than the current technology (Sanger's 'dideoxy' protocol-based capillary electrophoresis systems). Both computational and experimental studies are underway at ORNL towards demonstrating this nanotechnology concept.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • An apparatus and method for performing nucleic acid (DNA and/or RNA) sequencing on a single molecule. The genetic sequence information is obtained by probing through a DNA or RNA molecule base by base at nanometer scale as though looking through a strip of movie film. This DNA sequencing nanotechnology has the theoretical capability of performing DNA sequencing at a maximal rate of about 1,000,000 bases per second. This enhanced performance is made possible by a series of innovations including: novel applications of a fine-tuned nanometer gap for passage of a single DNA or RNA molecule; thin layer microfluidics for samplemore » loading and delivery; and programmable electric fields for precise control of DNA or RNA movement. Detection methods include nanoelectrode-gated tunneling current measurements, dielectric molecular characterization, and atomic force microscopy/electrostatic force microscopy (AFM/EFM) probing for nanoscale reading of the nucleic acid sequences.« less
  • An apparatus for carrying out the separation, detection, and/or counting of single molecules at nanometer scale. Molecular separation is achieved by driving single molecules through a microfluidic or nanofluidic medium using programmable and coordinated electric fields. In various embodiments, the fluidic medium is a strip of hydrophilic material on nonconductive hydrophobic surface, a trough produced by parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material on a hydrophilic base, or a covered passageway produced by parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material on a hydrophilic base together with a nonconductive cover on the parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material. The molecules are detected andmore » counted using nanoelectrode-gated electron tunneling methods, dielectric monitoring, and other methods.« less
  • Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. We have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-lasermore » excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, we have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. We have observed and manipulated individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead with an epifluorescence microscope. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • This document discusses the development of a laser based technique for the rapid sequencing of large fragments of DNA based upon the detection of single, fluorescently tagged nucleotides cleaved from a single DNA fragments. Demonstrated is significant progress on several of the important steps of this technique. The projected rate of sequencing is several hundred bases per second which is orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. Once developed, this technology could be utilized by investigators for rapid sequencing of genetic material from virtually any source. 24 refs., 4 figs.
  • Since the independent invention of DNA sequencing by Sanger and by Gilbert 30 years ago, it has grown from a small scale technique capable of reading several kilobase-pair of sequence per day into today's multibillion dollar industry. This growth has spurred the development of new sequencing technologies that do not involve either electrophoresis or Sanger sequencing chemistries. Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) involves multiple parallel micro-sequencing addition events occurring on a surface, where data from each round is detected by imaging. New High Throughput Technologies for DNA Sequencing and Genomics is the second volume in the Perspectives in Bioanalysis series, whichmore » looks at the electroanalytical chemistry of nucleic acids and proteins, development of electrochemical sensors and their application in biomedicine and in the new fields of genomics and proteomics. The authors have expertly formatted the information for a wide variety of readers, including new developments that will inspire students and young scientists to create new tools for science and medicine in the 21st century. Reviews of complementary developments in Sanger and SBS sequencing chemistries, capillary electrophoresis and microdevice integration, MS sequencing and applications set the framework for the book.« less