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Title: Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

Abstract

Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunkermore » silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
931889
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Engineering in Agriculture; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; BAGASSE; BIOMASS; EFFICIENCY; HARVESTING; MAIZE; MOISTURE; ROAD TRANSPORT; STORAGE; TRUCKS

Citation Formats

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F, and Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.13031/2013.23478.
Turhollow Jr, Anthony F, & Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form. United States. doi:10.13031/2013.23478.
Turhollow Jr, Anthony F, and Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine. Mon . "Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form". United States. doi:10.13031/2013.23478.
@article{osti_931889,
title = {Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form},
author = {Turhollow Jr, Anthony F and Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine},
abstractNote = {Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.},
doi = {10.13031/2013.23478},
journal = {Applied Engineering in Agriculture},
number = 4,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}