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Title: Intel Woodcrest: An Evaluation for Scientific Computing

Abstract

Intel recently began shipping its Xeon 5100 series processors, formerly known by their 'Woodcrest' code name. To evaluate the suitability of the Woodcrest processor for high-end scientific computing, we obtained access to a Woodcrest-based system at Intel and measured its performance first using computation and memory micro-benchmarks, followed by full applications from the areas of climate modeling and molecular dynamics. For computational benchmarks, the Woodcrest showed excellent performance compared to a test system that uses Opteron processors from Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), though its performance advantage for full applications was less definitive. Nevertheless, our evaluation suggests the Woodcrest to be a compelling foundation for future leadership class systems for scientific computing.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Center for Computational Sciences
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931771
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8th LCI International Conference on High-Performance Clustered Computing, South Lake Tahoe, CA, USA, 20070515, 20070517
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BENCHMARKS; EVALUATION; PERFORMANCE; SIMULATION; COMPUTERS

Citation Formats

Roth, Philip C, and Vetter, Jeffrey S. Intel Woodcrest: An Evaluation for Scientific Computing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Roth, Philip C, & Vetter, Jeffrey S. Intel Woodcrest: An Evaluation for Scientific Computing. United States.
Roth, Philip C, and Vetter, Jeffrey S. Mon . "Intel Woodcrest: An Evaluation for Scientific Computing". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931771,
title = {Intel Woodcrest: An Evaluation for Scientific Computing},
author = {Roth, Philip C and Vetter, Jeffrey S},
abstractNote = {Intel recently began shipping its Xeon 5100 series processors, formerly known by their 'Woodcrest' code name. To evaluate the suitability of the Woodcrest processor for high-end scientific computing, we obtained access to a Woodcrest-based system at Intel and measured its performance first using computation and memory micro-benchmarks, followed by full applications from the areas of climate modeling and molecular dynamics. For computational benchmarks, the Woodcrest showed excellent performance compared to a test system that uses Opteron processors from Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), though its performance advantage for full applications was less definitive. Nevertheless, our evaluation suggests the Woodcrest to be a compelling foundation for future leadership class systems for scientific computing.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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