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Title: Season mediates herbivore effects on litter and soil microbial abundance and activity in a semi-arid woodland

Abstract

Herbivores can directly impact ecosystem function by altering litter quality entering an ecosystem or indirectly by affecting a shift in the microbial community that mediate nutrient processes. We examine herbivore susceptibility and resistance effects on litter microarthropod and soil microbial communities to test the general hypothesis that herbivore driven changes in litter inputs will feedback to the microbial community. Our study population consisted of individual trees that are susceptible or resistant to the stem-boring moth (Dioryctria albovittella) and trees that herbivores have been manually removed since 1982. Moth herbivory increased pi on litter nitrogen concentrations (16%) and canopy precipitation infiltration (28%), both significant factors influencing litter and soil microbial populations. Our research resulted in three major conclusions: 1) In spite of an increase in litter quality, herbivory does not change litter microarthropod abundance or species richness. 2) Herbivore susceptibility alters bulk soil microbial communities, but not soil properties. 3) Season has a strong influence on microbial communities, and their response to herbivore inputs, in this semi-arid ecosystem.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. USFS
  3. Northern Arizona University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931745
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Plant and Soil; Journal Volume: 295; Journal Issue: ??
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; COMMUNITIES; ECOSYSTEMS; FEEDBACK; HYPOTHESIS; MOTHS; NITROGEN; NUTRIENTS; PRECIPITATION; SEASONS; SOILS; TREES; Community-level physiological profiles; enzyme activity; insect herbivory; litter microarthropods; microbial biomass

Citation Formats

Classen, Aimee T, Overby, Stephen, Hart, Stephen C, Koch, George W, and Whitham, Thomas G. Season mediates herbivore effects on litter and soil microbial abundance and activity in a semi-arid woodland. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s11104-007-9277-6.
Classen, Aimee T, Overby, Stephen, Hart, Stephen C, Koch, George W, & Whitham, Thomas G. Season mediates herbivore effects on litter and soil microbial abundance and activity in a semi-arid woodland. United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-007-9277-6.
Classen, Aimee T, Overby, Stephen, Hart, Stephen C, Koch, George W, and Whitham, Thomas G. Mon . "Season mediates herbivore effects on litter and soil microbial abundance and activity in a semi-arid woodland". United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-007-9277-6.
@article{osti_931745,
title = {Season mediates herbivore effects on litter and soil microbial abundance and activity in a semi-arid woodland},
author = {Classen, Aimee T and Overby, Stephen and Hart, Stephen C and Koch, George W and Whitham, Thomas G},
abstractNote = {Herbivores can directly impact ecosystem function by altering litter quality entering an ecosystem or indirectly by affecting a shift in the microbial community that mediate nutrient processes. We examine herbivore susceptibility and resistance effects on litter microarthropod and soil microbial communities to test the general hypothesis that herbivore driven changes in litter inputs will feedback to the microbial community. Our study population consisted of individual trees that are susceptible or resistant to the stem-boring moth (Dioryctria albovittella) and trees that herbivores have been manually removed since 1982. Moth herbivory increased pi on litter nitrogen concentrations (16%) and canopy precipitation infiltration (28%), both significant factors influencing litter and soil microbial populations. Our research resulted in three major conclusions: 1) In spite of an increase in litter quality, herbivory does not change litter microarthropod abundance or species richness. 2) Herbivore susceptibility alters bulk soil microbial communities, but not soil properties. 3) Season has a strong influence on microbial communities, and their response to herbivore inputs, in this semi-arid ecosystem.},
doi = {10.1007/s11104-007-9277-6},
journal = {Plant and Soil},
number = ??,
volume = 295,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}