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Title: Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

Abstract

This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given.more » This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Facility
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
931713
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; EXTRAPOLATION; HEAT FLUX; HEAT SINKS; INVERTERS; RECTIFIERS; REFRIGERANTS; RELIABILITY; SIMULATION; COOLING

Citation Formats

Lowe, Kirk T, Tolbert, Leon M, Ayers, Curtis William, Ozpineci, Burak, and Campbell, Jeremy B. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Lowe, Kirk T, Tolbert, Leon M, Ayers, Curtis William, Ozpineci, Burak, & Campbell, Jeremy B. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices. United States.
Lowe, Kirk T, Tolbert, Leon M, Ayers, Curtis William, Ozpineci, Burak, and Campbell, Jeremy B. Mon . "Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931713,
title = {Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices},
author = {Lowe, Kirk T and Tolbert, Leon M and Ayers, Curtis William and Ozpineci, Burak and Campbell, Jeremy B},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device},
doi = {},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications},
number = 3,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}