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Title: SIMULATION OF STRAIN INDUCED INTERFACE MIGRATION IN SYMMETRIC TILT GRAIN BOUNDARIES

Abstract

Grain boundary migration of flat symmetric tilt grain boundaries is simulated using molecular dynamics. The driving force for migration is achieved by applying uniaxial strain on one of the grains in the bicrystal, enabling the growth of strain free grain at the expense of strained grain. Arrhenius dependence of grain boundary mobility on temperature and a linear relation between mobility and grain boundary velocity are observed. Simulations suggest that the mechanism of migration is dependent on vacancy diffusion combined with local reshuffling of atoms near the grain boundary.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931712
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: TMS Annual meeting 07, Orlando, FL, USA, 20070225, 20070225
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Namilae, Sirish, Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam, and Gorti, Sarma B. SIMULATION OF STRAIN INDUCED INTERFACE MIGRATION IN SYMMETRIC TILT GRAIN BOUNDARIES. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Namilae, Sirish, Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam, & Gorti, Sarma B. SIMULATION OF STRAIN INDUCED INTERFACE MIGRATION IN SYMMETRIC TILT GRAIN BOUNDARIES. United States.
Namilae, Sirish, Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam, and Gorti, Sarma B. Mon . "SIMULATION OF STRAIN INDUCED INTERFACE MIGRATION IN SYMMETRIC TILT GRAIN BOUNDARIES". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931712,
title = {SIMULATION OF STRAIN INDUCED INTERFACE MIGRATION IN SYMMETRIC TILT GRAIN BOUNDARIES},
author = {Namilae, Sirish and Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam and Gorti, Sarma B},
abstractNote = {Grain boundary migration of flat symmetric tilt grain boundaries is simulated using molecular dynamics. The driving force for migration is achieved by applying uniaxial strain on one of the grains in the bicrystal, enabling the growth of strain free grain at the expense of strained grain. Arrhenius dependence of grain boundary mobility on temperature and a linear relation between mobility and grain boundary velocity are observed. Simulations suggest that the mechanism of migration is dependent on vacancy diffusion combined with local reshuffling of atoms near the grain boundary.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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