skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

Abstract

Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. Suffolk University, Boston
  3. National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931689
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annual Review of Material Science; Journal Volume: 37
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; COMPUTERS; DIMENSIONS; ELECTROMECHANICS; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; MEMBRANES; MICROSCOPY; POLARIZATION; PROBES; PROTEINS; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Jesse, Stephen, Karapetian, Edgar, Mirman, B, Eliseev, E. A., and Morozovska, A. N.. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323.
Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Jesse, Stephen, Karapetian, Edgar, Mirman, B, Eliseev, E. A., & Morozovska, A. N.. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy. United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323.
Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Jesse, Stephen, Karapetian, Edgar, Mirman, B, Eliseev, E. A., and Morozovska, A. N.. Mon . "Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy". United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323.
@article{osti_931689,
title = {Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy},
author = {Kalinin, Sergei V and Rodriguez, Brian J and Jesse, Stephen and Karapetian, Edgar and Mirman, B and Eliseev, E. A. and Morozovska, A. N.},
abstractNote = {Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.},
doi = {10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323},
journal = {Annual Review of Material Science},
number = ,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • An approach for combined imaging of elastic and electromechanical properties of materials, referred to as piezoacoustic scanning probe microscopy (PA-SPM), is presented. Applicability of this technique for elastic and electromechanical imaging with nanoscale resolution in such dissimilar materials as ferroelectrics and biological tissues is demonstrated. The PA-SPM signal formation is analyzed based on the theory of nanoelectromechanics of piezoelectric indentation and signal sensitivity to materials properties and imaging conditions. It is shown that simultaneous measurements of local indentation stiffness and indentation piezocoefficient provide the most complete description of the local electroelastic properties for transversally isotropic materials, thus making piezoacoustic SPMmore » a comprehensive imaging and analysis tool. The contrast formation mechanism in the low frequency regime is described in terms of tip-surface contact mechanics. Signal generation volumes for electromechanical and elastic signals are determined and relative sensitivity of piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) for topographic cross-talk is established.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The interaction of ferroelectric 180o-domain wall with a strongly inhomogeneous electric field of biased Scanning Probe Microscope tip is analyzed within continuous Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory. Equilibrium shape of the initially flat domain wall boundary bends, attracts or repulses from the probe apex, depending on the sign and value of the applied bias. For large tip-wall separations, the probe-induced domain nucleation is possible. The approximate analytical expressions for the polarization distribution are derived using direct variational method. The expressions provide insight how the equilibrium polarization distribution depends on the wall finite-width, correlation and depolarization effects, electrostatic potential distribution of the probe andmore » ferroelectric material parameters.« less
  • The role of electrochemical phenomena in Scanning Probe Microscopy of ferroelectric thin films
  • A variant of piezo force microscopy was used to characterize the effect of strain on polarization in [(BaTiO3)n/(SrTiO3)m]p superlattices. The measurements were compared to theoretical predictions based on phase-field calculations. When polarization is constrained to be perpendicular to the substrate, the measured polarization and domain morphology agree quantitatively with the predictions. This case allows the presence of an internal electric field in the thin film to be identified. The measured trend in piezoelectric response with strain state was in qualitative agreement with predictions and the differences were consistent with the presence of internal electrical fields. Clear differences in domain morphologymore » with strain were observed and in some cases the lateral anisotropic strain appeared to influence the domain morphology. The differences in magnitude and morphology were attributed to the internal electric fields and anisotropic strains.« less