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Title: Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

Abstract

Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. Suffolk University, Boston
  3. National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931689
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annual Review of Material Science; Journal Volume: 37
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; COMPUTERS; DIMENSIONS; ELECTROMECHANICS; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; MEMBRANES; MICROSCOPY; POLARIZATION; PROBES; PROTEINS; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Jesse, Stephen, Karapetian, Edgar, Mirman, B, Eliseev, E. A., and Morozovska, A. N. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323.
Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Jesse, Stephen, Karapetian, Edgar, Mirman, B, Eliseev, E. A., & Morozovska, A. N. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy. United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323.
Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Jesse, Stephen, Karapetian, Edgar, Mirman, B, Eliseev, E. A., and Morozovska, A. N. Mon . "Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy". United States. doi:10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323.
@article{osti_931689,
title = {Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy},
author = {Kalinin, Sergei V and Rodriguez, Brian J and Jesse, Stephen and Karapetian, Edgar and Mirman, B and Eliseev, E. A. and Morozovska, A. N.},
abstractNote = {Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.},
doi = {10.1146/annurev.matsci.37.052506.084323},
journal = {Annual Review of Material Science},
number = ,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}