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Title: Fabrication of Filamentary YBCO Coated Conductor by Inkjet Printing

Abstract

Inkjet printing is a potentially low cost, high rate method for depositing precursors for filamentary YBCO coated conductors. The method offers considerable flexibility of filament pattern, width, and thickness. Using standard solution precursors and RABiTSTM substrates, the printing, processing, and properties of some inkjet-derived filamentary YBCO coated conductors for Second Generation (2G) wire are demonstrated on a laboratory scale. Some systematic variations of growth rate and critical transport current with filament width are observed and discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
OE USDOE - Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution
OSTI Identifier:
931666
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2006 Applied Superconductivity Conference, Seattle, WA, USA, 20060828, 20060901
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FABRICATION; YTTRIUM OXIDES; BARIUM OXIDES; COPPER OXIDES; INKS; PRECURSOR; FILAMENTS; COATINGS; Ink jet printing; AC losses; YBCO; Coated conductor; 2G

Citation Formats

List III, Frederick Alyious, Kodenkandath, Thomas, and Rupich, Marty. Fabrication of Filamentary YBCO Coated Conductor by Inkjet Printing. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
List III, Frederick Alyious, Kodenkandath, Thomas, & Rupich, Marty. Fabrication of Filamentary YBCO Coated Conductor by Inkjet Printing. United States.
List III, Frederick Alyious, Kodenkandath, Thomas, and Rupich, Marty. Mon . "Fabrication of Filamentary YBCO Coated Conductor by Inkjet Printing". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931666,
title = {Fabrication of Filamentary YBCO Coated Conductor by Inkjet Printing},
author = {List III, Frederick Alyious and Kodenkandath, Thomas and Rupich, Marty},
abstractNote = {Inkjet printing is a potentially low cost, high rate method for depositing precursors for filamentary YBCO coated conductors. The method offers considerable flexibility of filament pattern, width, and thickness. Using standard solution precursors and RABiTSTM substrates, the printing, processing, and properties of some inkjet-derived filamentary YBCO coated conductors for Second Generation (2G) wire are demonstrated on a laboratory scale. Some systematic variations of growth rate and critical transport current with filament width are observed and discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The second generation (2G) high temperature superconductors (HTS) wire offers potential benefits for many electric power applications, including ones requiring filamentized conductors with low ac loss, such as transformers and fault current limiters. However, the use of 2G wire in these applications requires the development of both novel multi-filamentary conductor designs with lower ac losses and the development of advanced manufacturing technologies that enable the low-cost manufacturing of these filamentized architectures. This Phase I SBIR project focused on testing inkjet printing as a potential low-cost, roll-to-roll manufacturing technique to fabricate potential low ac loss filamentized architectures directly on the 2Gmore » template strips.« less
  • To achieve low ac losses in applied ac fields, YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO) filaments were created on a RABiTS buffered substrate through solution inkjet deposition. The metal organic decomposition (MOD) solution was placed into an inkjet nozzle and filaments of widths of 100 ?m and 0.8 mm were placed on the substrate at a spacing of 50 to 100 ?m. Each sample, which had a width of 1 cm and a nominal length of 4 cm, was placed in a perpendicular ac field and the ac losses were measured thermally as a function of the field strengths up to 100 mT andmore » at frequencies between 60 Hz and 120 Hz. It was found that samples with inkjet filaments had a high degree of coupling loss. This coupling possibly extended between filaments along the sample length as removal of the conductor ends did not reduce the coupling loss contribution. Reduction in ac loss was observed in samples with laser-scribed filaments that were made from the same MOD solution.« less
  • The ROEBEL cable concept allows for a high critical current cable assembled using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}} coated conductors. this approach to cable design leads to several technological improvements if applied to the manufacture process of next generation low inductance, high current density HTS coils. A reduction in inductance proves to be extremely important when it comes to protection of coils capable of generating fields in the range of 40-50T, such as the ones needed in the last stage of the cooling channel of a muon collider. In this work several aspects are presented including the qualification andmore » minimum requirements for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}}coated conductor in terms of 2D current density uniformity and the manufacturing process of ROEBEL cables. Test results achieved using a superconducting transformer for critical current measurements in liquid helium are shown, discussed and compared to the performance of a single YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{Delta}} coated conductor tape.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Inclined substrate deposition (ISD) has the potential for rapid production of high-quality biaxially textured buffer layers, which are important for YBCO-coated conductor applications. We have grown biaxially textured MgO films by ISD at deposition rates of 20-100 {angstrom}/sec. Columnar grains with a roof-tile surface structure were observed in the ISD-MgO films. X-ray pole figure analysis revealed that the (002) planes of the ISD-MgO films are tilted at an angle from the substrate normal. A small {phi}-scan full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of {approx}9{sup o} was observed on MgO films deposited at an inclination angle of 55{sup o}. In-plane texture inmore » the ISD MgO films developed in the first 0.5 {micro}m from the interface, then stabilized with further increases in film thickness. YBCO films deposited by pulsed laser deposition on ISD-MgO buffered Hastelloy C276 substrates were biaxially aligned with the c-axis parallel to the substrate normal. T{sub c} of 91 K with a sharp transition and transport J{sub c} of 5.5 x 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K in self-field were measured on a YBCO film that was 0.46-{micro}m thick, 4-mm wide, 10-mm long.« less