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Title: The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

Abstract

A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. AOL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
931480
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Nuclear Materials; Journal Volume: 362; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; EMBRITTLEMENT; IRRADIATION; NEUTRON FLUENCE; PLATES; POWER REACTORS; PRESSURE VESSELS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RADIATIONS; REGULATORY GUIDES; STEELS; TRANSITION TEMPERATURE

Citation Formats

Wang, Jy-An John, Rao, Nageswara S, and Konduri, Savanthi. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2006.12.013.
Wang, Jy-An John, Rao, Nageswara S, & Konduri, Savanthi. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2006.12.013.
Wang, Jy-An John, Rao, Nageswara S, and Konduri, Savanthi. Mon . "The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2006.12.013.
@article{osti_931480,
title = {The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels},
author = {Wang, Jy-An John and Rao, Nageswara S and Konduri, Savanthi},
abstractNote = {A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2006.12.013},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = 1,
volume = 362,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data,more » compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.« less
  • Advances in experimental research in the United States toward an improved understanding of property changes in steel by elevated temperature ( about 288/sup 0/ C) irradiation ar summarized. Four areas of investigation are reviewed, including the confirmation and demonstration of guidelines for radiation-resistant steels, the isolation of metallurgical factors contributing to variable radiation embrittlement sensitivity, the qualification of in situ heat treatments for periodic vessel embrittlement relief, and the correlation of notch ductility and fracture toughness changes with irradiation. Overall, the current state of the art provides both a high capability for tailoring steels for radiation service in new vesselmore » construction and a promising method for controlling radiation embrittlement buildup in existing vessel construction.« less
  • The issues surrounding the radiation embrittlement of pressure-vessel steels have a broad range. On one side, there are questions of deeply fundamental scientific significance, like the mechanisms of the interaction of radiation with matter and the radiation damage it causes. On the other, there are questions of public policy, with serious technological, economic and safety implications. The older nuclear power plants are a major concern, particularly the PWRs, where pressure vessels are more seriously embrittled. In a recent study of residual life assessment of major light-water reactor components, the reactor pressure vessel was judged, for PWRs, to be the mostmore » critical major component as far as plant safety is concerned. The most likely degradation sites are the circumferential and axial weldments in the beltline of the vessel, and neutron embrittlement is believed to be the most important potential degradation mechanism.« less
  • The complex nonlinear dependencies observed in typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material embrittlement data, as well as the inherent large uncertainties and scatter in the radiation embrittlement data, make prediction of radiation embrittlement a difficult task. Conventional statistical and deterministic approaches have only resulted in rather large uncertainties, in part because they do not fully exploit domain-specific mechanisms. The domain models built by researchers in the field, on the other hand, do not fully exploit the statistical and information content of the data. As evidenced in previous studies, it is unlikely that a single method, whether statistical, nonlinear, or domainmore » model, will outperform all others. More generally, considering the complexity of the embrittlement prediction problem, it is highly unlikely that a single best method exists and is tractable, even in theory. In this paper, we propose to combine a number of complementary methods including domain models, neural networks, and nearest neighbor regressions (NNRs). Such a combination of methods has become possible because of recent developments in measurement-based optimal fusers in the area of information fusion. The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor RPV steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation-parameters are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results-temperature indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.« less