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Title: Large-Scale Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Viscoplastic and Fracturing Thin Shells Subjected to Shocks and Detonations

Abstract

The fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock- and detonation-loaded thin-walled structures requires numerical methods that can cope with large deformations as well as local topology changes. We present a robust level-set-based approach that integrates a Lagrangian thin-shell finite element solver with fracture and fragmentation capabilities and an Eulerian Cartesian fluid solver with optional dynamic mesh adaptation. As computational applications, we consider the plastic deformation of a copper plate impacted by a strong piston-induced pressure wave inside a water pipe and the induction of large plastic deformations and rupture of thin aluminum tubes due to the passage of ethylene-oxygen detonations.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931478
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Computers & Structures; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 11-14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS; FRACTURING; LAGRANGIAN FUNCTION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; SHELLS; SHOCK WAVES; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; PLASTICITY; VISCOSITY; COPPER; PLATES; ALUMINIUM; TUBES; fluid-structure interaction; thin shells; detonations; water hammer; large deformations; fracture; dynamic mesh adaptation; parallelization

Citation Formats

Deiterding, Ralf. Large-Scale Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Viscoplastic and Fracturing Thin Shells Subjected to Shocks and Detonations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Deiterding, Ralf. Large-Scale Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Viscoplastic and Fracturing Thin Shells Subjected to Shocks and Detonations. United States.
Deiterding, Ralf. Mon . "Large-Scale Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Viscoplastic and Fracturing Thin Shells Subjected to Shocks and Detonations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931478,
title = {Large-Scale Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Viscoplastic and Fracturing Thin Shells Subjected to Shocks and Detonations},
author = {Deiterding, Ralf},
abstractNote = {The fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock- and detonation-loaded thin-walled structures requires numerical methods that can cope with large deformations as well as local topology changes. We present a robust level-set-based approach that integrates a Lagrangian thin-shell finite element solver with fracture and fragmentation capabilities and an Eulerian Cartesian fluid solver with optional dynamic mesh adaptation. As computational applications, we consider the plastic deformation of a copper plate impacted by a strong piston-induced pressure wave inside a water pipe and the induction of large plastic deformations and rupture of thin aluminum tubes due to the passage of ethylene-oxygen detonations.},
doi = {},
journal = {Computers & Structures},
number = 11-14,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded thin-walled structures requires numerical methods that can cope with large deformations as well as local topology changes. We present a robust level-set-based approach that integrates a Lagrangian thin-shell finite element solver with fracture and fragmentation capabilities into an Eulerian Cartesian fluid solver with embedded boundary and mesh adaptation capability. As main computational applications, we consider the plastic deformation and rupture of thin plates subjected to explosion and piston-induced pressure waves in water.
  • We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid–fluid interfaces where the structural nodalmore » positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.« less
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  • Magnetic flux compression generators rely on the expansion of thin ductile shells to generate magnetic fields. These thin shells are filled with high explosives, which when detonated, cause the shell to expand to over 200% strain at strain-rates on the order of 10 4 s -1. Experimental data indicate the development and growth of multiple plastic instabilities which appear in a quasi-periodic pattern on the surfaces of the shells. These quasi-periodic instabilities are connected by localized zones of intense shear that are oriented approximately 45° from the outward radial direction. The quasi-periodic instabilities continue to develop and eventually become through-cracks,more » causing the shell to fragment. A viscoplastic constitutive model is formulated to model the high strain-rate expansion and provide insight into the development of plastic instabilities. The formulation of the viscoplastic constitutive model includes the effects of shock heating and damage in the form of microvoid nucleation, growth, and coalescence in the expanding shell. This model uses the Johnson-Cook strength model with the Mie-Grueneisen equation of state and a modified Gurson yield surface. The constitutive model includes the modifications proposed by Tvergaard and the plastic strain controlled nucleation introduced by Neeleman. The constitutive model is implemented as a user material subroutine into ABAQUS/Explicit, which is a commercially available nonlinear explicit dynamic finite element program. A cylindrical shell is modeled using both axisymmetric and plane strain elements. Two experiments were conducted involving plane wave detonated, explosively filled, copper cylinders. Instability, displacement, and velocity data were recorded using a fast framing camera and a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Good agreement is shown between the numerical results and experimental data. An additional explosively bulged cylinder experiment was also performed and a photomicrograph of an instability is shown to provide a qualitative comparison between the experimental observations and the numerical predictions.« less
  • The large-scale structure of flare-associated interplanetary shocks is investigated by examining the properties of 116 shocks which originated in solar flare events during a 18.7-year period commencing mid-May 1967. The best average representation of these shocks is an expansion which is uniform over about 100/sup 0/. The highest compression ratio across the shock (approx.2.7) is about 15/sup 0/ west of the radial from the flare site. The loose coupling of shocks and their drivers is supported by the observation that drivers are generally only detected for shocks originating near central meridian. A comparison of the numbers of shocks per yearmore » with the numbers of sudden commencement geomagnetic storms indicates that the percentage of shocks at 1 AU which originate in flare events is less than 50%. Many shock-flare associations made in the past are probably in error.« less