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Title: Temperature effect on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316L stainless steel: cyclic non-stabilization and an invariable fatigue parameter

Abstract

The temperature effect on the cyclic non-stabilization of cold-worked 316L stainless steel during low-cycle fatigue deformation was investigated. The material underwent additional cyclic hardening at room temperature and in the temperature range of 250-600 C; the hardening at room temperature came from plasticity-induced martensite transformation and the hardening in the temperature range of 250-600 C was attributed to dynamic strain aging. These hardening mechanisms competed with the cyclic softening induced by dynamic recovery, which is generally predominant in cold-worked materials, and this led to the cyclic non-stabilization of the material. Three fatigue parameters: the stress amplitude, plastic strain amplitude and plastic strain energy density, were evaluated to find an invariable fatigue parameter. The results revealed that the plastic strain energy density was stabilized at the early stage of fatigue life and nearly invariant through the entire life.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
931440
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Science and Engineering A; Journal Volume: 457; Journal Issue: A
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AMPLITUDES; DEFORMATION; ENERGY DENSITY; HARDENING; MARTENSITE; STRAIN AGING; STRAINS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSFORMATIONS; STAINLESS STEEL-316L

Citation Formats

Hong, Seong Gu, and Byun, Thak Sang. Temperature effect on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316L stainless steel: cyclic non-stabilization and an invariable fatigue parameter. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2006.12.035.
Hong, Seong Gu, & Byun, Thak Sang. Temperature effect on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316L stainless steel: cyclic non-stabilization and an invariable fatigue parameter. United States. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2006.12.035.
Hong, Seong Gu, and Byun, Thak Sang. Mon . "Temperature effect on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316L stainless steel: cyclic non-stabilization and an invariable fatigue parameter". United States. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2006.12.035.
@article{osti_931440,
title = {Temperature effect on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316L stainless steel: cyclic non-stabilization and an invariable fatigue parameter},
author = {Hong, Seong Gu and Byun, Thak Sang},
abstractNote = {The temperature effect on the cyclic non-stabilization of cold-worked 316L stainless steel during low-cycle fatigue deformation was investigated. The material underwent additional cyclic hardening at room temperature and in the temperature range of 250-600 C; the hardening at room temperature came from plasticity-induced martensite transformation and the hardening in the temperature range of 250-600 C was attributed to dynamic strain aging. These hardening mechanisms competed with the cyclic softening induced by dynamic recovery, which is generally predominant in cold-worked materials, and this led to the cyclic non-stabilization of the material. Three fatigue parameters: the stress amplitude, plastic strain amplitude and plastic strain energy density, were evaluated to find an invariable fatigue parameter. The results revealed that the plastic strain energy density was stabilized at the early stage of fatigue life and nearly invariant through the entire life.},
doi = {10.1016/j.msea.2006.12.035},
journal = {Materials Science and Engineering A},
number = A,
volume = 457,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The low-cycle fatigue results of three heats of Type 304 stainless steel have been obtained at 593/sup 0/C under selected cyclic-loading conditions. The results are compared with those generated for a reference heat of steel for which extensive low-cycle fatigue data are available. Observation of the microstructures of specimens in the pretest condition after a given heat treatment and examination of fatigue fracture surfaces were conducted by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. The three heats of stainless steel, which exhibit different microstructural features, show approximately the same continuous-cycling low-cycle fatigue behavior as that of themore » reference heat. However, the three materials show improved fatigue strength during tensile hold-time conditions where significant creep occurs. The fatigue properties determined in the present study for the different heats of steel are consistent with the observed microstructural features. Finally, the creep-fatigue properties of the heats as well as the microstructural observations are discussed in terms of a damage-rate approach recently developed by the authors.« less
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