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Title: Carbon Nanotube Electronic Displacement Encoder with Sub-Nanometer Resolution

Abstract

Electric conductance of a telescope double-walled carbon nanotube oscillates as a function of telescoping distance. The period of such oscillation is one half of the lattice constant of graphene, $a/2 = 0.123$nm, instead of the lattice constant $a$ as expected. The halving of the period results from the combination of the periodic interlayer lattice alignment and the occurrence of antiresonance. When combined with the periodicity in the energy space at a fixed displacement, the telescopic displacement can be reliably and accurately determined to the sub-nanometer resolution. This effect can be used to design an electronic displacement encoder.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931438
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CARBON; NANOTUBES; OSCILLATIONS; PERIODICITY; RESOLUTION; TELESCOPES; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY

Citation Formats

Jiang, H., Yu, M.-F., Lu, Jun-Qiang, Huang, Y., Johnson, H. T., Zhang, Xiaoguang, and Ferreira, P. Carbon Nanotube Electronic Displacement Encoder with Sub-Nanometer Resolution. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Jiang, H., Yu, M.-F., Lu, Jun-Qiang, Huang, Y., Johnson, H. T., Zhang, Xiaoguang, & Ferreira, P. Carbon Nanotube Electronic Displacement Encoder with Sub-Nanometer Resolution. United States.
Jiang, H., Yu, M.-F., Lu, Jun-Qiang, Huang, Y., Johnson, H. T., Zhang, Xiaoguang, and Ferreira, P. Mon . "Carbon Nanotube Electronic Displacement Encoder with Sub-Nanometer Resolution". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931438,
title = {Carbon Nanotube Electronic Displacement Encoder with Sub-Nanometer Resolution},
author = {Jiang, H. and Yu, M.-F. and Lu, Jun-Qiang and Huang, Y. and Johnson, H. T. and Zhang, Xiaoguang and Ferreira, P.},
abstractNote = {Electric conductance of a telescope double-walled carbon nanotube oscillates as a function of telescoping distance. The period of such oscillation is one half of the lattice constant of graphene, $a/2 = 0.123$nm, instead of the lattice constant $a$ as expected. The halving of the period results from the combination of the periodic interlayer lattice alignment and the occurrence of antiresonance. When combined with the periodicity in the energy space at a fixed displacement, the telescopic displacement can be reliably and accurately determined to the sub-nanometer resolution. This effect can be used to design an electronic displacement encoder.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience},
number = 3,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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