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Title: Interactive effects of ozone and climate on tree growth and water use in a southern Appalachian forest in the USA

Abstract

Summary: {sm_bullet}Documentation of the degree and direction of effects of ozone on transpiration of canopies of mature forest trees is critically needed to model ozone effects on forest water use and growth in a warmer future climate. {sm_bullet}Patterns of sap flow in stems and soil moisture in the rooting zones of mature trees, coupled with late-season streamflow in three forested watersheds in east Tennessee, USA, were analyzed to determine relative influences of ozone and other climatic variables on canopy physiology and streamflow patterns.{sm_bullet}Statistically significant increases in whole-tree canopy conductance, depletion of soil moisture in the rooting zone, and reduced late-season streamflow in forested watersheds were detected in response to increasing ambient ozone levels. {sm_bullet}Short-term changes in canopy water use and empirically modeled streamflow patterns over a 23-yr observation period suggest that current ambient ozone exposures may exacerbate the frequency and level of negative effects of drought on forest growth and stream health.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired)
  2. University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada
  3. ORNL
  4. USDA Forest Service
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931387
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: New Phytologist; Journal Issue: 174
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CANOPIES; CLIMATES; DROUGHTS; FORESTS; MOISTURE; OZONE; PHYSIOLOGY; SOILS; TENNESSEE; TRANSPIRATION; TREES; WATER USE; WATERSHEDS

Citation Formats

McLaughlin, Samuel B., Nosal, M., Wullschleger, Stan D, and Sun, G. Interactive effects of ozone and climate on tree growth and water use in a southern Appalachian forest in the USA. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01970.x.
McLaughlin, Samuel B., Nosal, M., Wullschleger, Stan D, & Sun, G. Interactive effects of ozone and climate on tree growth and water use in a southern Appalachian forest in the USA. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01970.x.
McLaughlin, Samuel B., Nosal, M., Wullschleger, Stan D, and Sun, G. Mon . "Interactive effects of ozone and climate on tree growth and water use in a southern Appalachian forest in the USA". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01970.x.
@article{osti_931387,
title = {Interactive effects of ozone and climate on tree growth and water use in a southern Appalachian forest in the USA},
author = {McLaughlin, Samuel B. and Nosal, M. and Wullschleger, Stan D and Sun, G.},
abstractNote = {Summary: {sm_bullet}Documentation of the degree and direction of effects of ozone on transpiration of canopies of mature forest trees is critically needed to model ozone effects on forest water use and growth in a warmer future climate. {sm_bullet}Patterns of sap flow in stems and soil moisture in the rooting zones of mature trees, coupled with late-season streamflow in three forested watersheds in east Tennessee, USA, were analyzed to determine relative influences of ozone and other climatic variables on canopy physiology and streamflow patterns.{sm_bullet}Statistically significant increases in whole-tree canopy conductance, depletion of soil moisture in the rooting zone, and reduced late-season streamflow in forested watersheds were detected in response to increasing ambient ozone levels. {sm_bullet}Short-term changes in canopy water use and empirically modeled streamflow patterns over a 23-yr observation period suggest that current ambient ozone exposures may exacerbate the frequency and level of negative effects of drought on forest growth and stream health.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01970.x},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = 174,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Documentation of the degree and direction of effects of ozone on transpiration of canopies of mature forest trees is critically needed to model ozone effects on forest water use and growth in a warmer future climate. Patterns of sap flow in stems and soil moisture in the rooting zones of mature trees, coupled with late-season streamflow in three forested watersheds in east Tennessee, USA, were analyzed to determine relative influences of ozone and other climatic variables on canopy physiology and streamflow patterns. Statistically significant increases in whole-tree canopy conductance, depletion of soil moisture in the rooting zone, and reduced late-seasonmore » streamflow in forested watersheds were detected in response to increasing ambient ozone levels. Short-term changes in canopy water use and empirically modeled streamflow patterns over a 23-yr observation period suggest that current ambient ozone exposures may exacerbate the frequency and level of negative effects of drought on forest growth and stream health.« less
  • Annual growth of wetland trees has been shown to be related to variations in hydrologic regimes, however the relationship between water level fluctuations and tree growth season has not been documented. In a study of weekly growth patterns of three wetland tree species in a southeastern forested wetland, transfer function modeling was used to examine relationships between tree growth and the weekly changes in water levels and weekly changes in the atmospheric water balance (precipitation minus potential evapotranspiration). An autoregressive-moving average model was fit to each time series of water-level changes (input series), and the selected model was then usedmore » to filter the tree-growth (output) time series. Cross-correlations between each input and output time series were examined and significant relationships between weekly changes in water levels and tree diameter were found for Nyssa sylvatica and Taxodium distichum trees growing at sites with periodic shallow flooding. There were no significant relationships between changing water levels and tree growth in areas with permanent flooding or soil saturation. Further, changes in growth of N. sylvatica, N. aquatica, and T. distichum were significantly cross-correlated with weekly changes in the atmospheric water balance at sites with either periodic or permanent flooding. 59 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • A large portion of terrestrial carbon (C) resides in soil organic carbon (SOC). The dynamics of this large reservoir depend on many factors, including climate. Measurements of {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C ratios, C concentrations, and C:N ratios at six forest sites in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) were used to explore several hypotheses concerning the relative importance of factors that control soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and SOC turnover. Mean {delta}{sup 13}C values increased with soil depth and decreasing C concentrations along a continuum from fresh litter inputs to more decomposed soil constituents. Data from the six forest sites, in combinationmore » with data from a literature review, indicate that the extent of change in {delta}{sup 13}C values from forest litter inputs to mineral soil (20 cm deep) is significantly associated with mean annual temperature. The findings support a conceptual model of vertical changes in forest soil {delta}{sup 13}C values, C concentrations, and C:N ratios that are interrelated through climate controls on decomposition. We hypothesize that, if other environmental factors (like soil moisture) are not limiting, then temperature and litter quality indirectly control the extent of isotopic fractionation during SOM decomposition in temperate forest ecosystems.« less
  • A large portion of terrestrial carbon (C) resides in soil organic carbon (SOC). The dynamics of this large reservoir depend on many factors, including climate. Measurements of {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C ratios, C concentrations, and C:N ratios at six forest sites in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) were used to explore several hypotheses concerning the relative importance of factors that control soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and SOC turnover. Mean {delta}{sup 13}C values increased with soil depth and decreasing C concentrations along a continuum from fresh litter inputs to more decomposed soil constituents. Data from the six forest sites, in combinationmore » with data from a literature review, indicate that the extent of change in {delta}{sup 13}C values from forest litter inputs to mineral soil is significantly associated with mean annual temperature. The findings support a conceptual model of vertical changes in forest soil {delta}{sup 13}C values, C concentrations, and C:N ratios that are interrelated through climate controls on decomposition. The authors hypothesize that, if other environmental factors are not limiting, then temperature and litter quality indirectly control the extent of isotopic fractionation during SOM decomposition in temperate forest ecosystems.« less
  • How will regional growth and mortality change with even relatively small climate shifts, even independent of catastrophic disturbances? This question is particularly acute for the North American boreal forest, which is carbon-dense and subject The goals of this study were to combine dendrochronological sampling, inventory records, and machine-learning algorithms to understand how tree growth and death have changed at one highly studied site (Northern Old Black Spruce, NOBS) in the central Canadian boreal forest. Over the 1999-2012 inventory period, mean DBH increased even as stand density and basal area declined significantly from 41.3 to 37.5 m2 ha-1. Tree mortality averagedmore » 1.4┬▒0.6% yr-1, with most mortality occurring in medium-sized trees. A combined tree ring chronology constructed from 2001, 2004, and 2012 sampling showed several periods of extreme growth depression, with increased mortality lagging depressed growth by ~5 years. Minimum and maximum air temperatures exerted a negative influence on tree growth, while precipitation and climate moisture index had a positive effect; both current- and previous-year data exerted significant effects. Models based on these variables explained 23-44% of the ring-width variability. There have been at least one, and probably two, significant recruitment episodes since stand initiation, and we infer that past climate extremes led to significant NOBS mortality still visible in the current forest structure. These results imply that a combination of successional and demographic processes, along with mortality driven by abiotic factors, continue to affect the stand, with significant implications for our understanding of previous work at NOBS and the sustainable management of regional forests.« less