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Title: Substrate effects on surface plasmons in single nanoholes

Abstract

Light transmission and electric field enhancement are caculated for a cylindrical aperture in a silver slab resting on a glass substrate. We find that these properties are influenced significantly by the presence of the substrate. The results suggest that variations in the local dielectric alter the properties of localized surface plasmons that drive the field enhancement and transmission.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)
  3. Northwestern University, Evanston
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); ORNL other overhead
OSTI Identifier:
931312
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 435; Journal Issue: 1-3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; APERTURES; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRIC FIELDS; GLASS; LIGHT TRANSMISSION; PLASMONS; SILVER; SUBSTRATES; light transmission; field enhancement; spectroscopy

Citation Formats

Shuford, Kevin L, Gray, Stephen K., Ratner, Mark A., and Schatz, George C. Substrate effects on surface plasmons in single nanoholes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cplett.2006.12.062.
Shuford, Kevin L, Gray, Stephen K., Ratner, Mark A., & Schatz, George C. Substrate effects on surface plasmons in single nanoholes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cplett.2006.12.062.
Shuford, Kevin L, Gray, Stephen K., Ratner, Mark A., and Schatz, George C. Mon . "Substrate effects on surface plasmons in single nanoholes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cplett.2006.12.062.
@article{osti_931312,
title = {Substrate effects on surface plasmons in single nanoholes},
author = {Shuford, Kevin L and Gray, Stephen K. and Ratner, Mark A. and Schatz, George C.},
abstractNote = {Light transmission and electric field enhancement are caculated for a cylindrical aperture in a silver slab resting on a glass substrate. We find that these properties are influenced significantly by the presence of the substrate. The results suggest that variations in the local dielectric alter the properties of localized surface plasmons that drive the field enhancement and transmission.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cplett.2006.12.062},
journal = {Chemical Physics Letters},
number = 1-3,
volume = 435,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Light transmission and electric field enhancement are calculated for a cylindrical aperture in a silver slab resting on a glass substrate. We find that these properties are influenced significantly by the presence of the substrate. The results suggest that variations in the local dielectric alter the properties of localized surface plasmons that drive the field enhancement and transmission.
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