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Title: Targeted medication delivery using magnetic nanostructures

Abstract

We use quaternion molecular dynamics simulations to describe field-induced structural transitions in systems of few magnetic dipoles and their use for targeted medication delivery. Compact ring isomers of magnetic particles are contained, together with molecules of an active medication, inside inert microcapsules. The filled microcapsules may be transported within the body using a weak,inhomogeneous magnetic field. Medication release is triggered by puncturing the container during a structural transition within the magnetic subsystem, induced by an externally applied strong magnetic field. Our simulations describe not only the time evolution of the magnetic subsystem during a successful medication release, but also address ways to suppress an accidental release induced by thermal and magnetic fluctuations.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931309
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter; Journal Volume: 19
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Yoon, Mina. Targeted medication delivery using magnetic nanostructures. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1088/0953-8984/19/8/086210.
Yoon, Mina. Targeted medication delivery using magnetic nanostructures. United States. doi:10.1088/0953-8984/19/8/086210.
Yoon, Mina. Mon . "Targeted medication delivery using magnetic nanostructures". United States. doi:10.1088/0953-8984/19/8/086210.
@article{osti_931309,
title = {Targeted medication delivery using magnetic nanostructures},
author = {Yoon, Mina},
abstractNote = {We use quaternion molecular dynamics simulations to describe field-induced structural transitions in systems of few magnetic dipoles and their use for targeted medication delivery. Compact ring isomers of magnetic particles are contained, together with molecules of an active medication, inside inert microcapsules. The filled microcapsules may be transported within the body using a weak,inhomogeneous magnetic field. Medication release is triggered by puncturing the container during a structural transition within the magnetic subsystem, induced by an externally applied strong magnetic field. Our simulations describe not only the time evolution of the magnetic subsystem during a successful medication release, but also address ways to suppress an accidental release induced by thermal and magnetic fluctuations.},
doi = {10.1088/0953-8984/19/8/086210},
journal = {Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter},
number = ,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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