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Title: OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF WELDED AND BASE METAL UNS N06025

Abstract

The oxidation behavior of specimens containing tungsten inert gas welds of UNS N06025 (NiCrFeAlY) was investigated in air for up to 5,000h at 900 -1000 C and 1,000h at 1100 -1200 C. In general, the microstructure was very homogeneous in the weld with smaller carbides and the Al2O3 penetrations were similar or smaller compared to those formed in the base metal. Above 1000 C, significant spallation was observed and Al and Cr depletion in the metal was observed to a similar extent in the weld and base metal. The maximum internal oxidation depth of the base metal at 900 and 1100 C was lower than several other commercial Ni-base alloys.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. Thyssen-Krupp VDM
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
931294
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: NACE Corrosion 2007, Nashville, TN, USA, 20070313, 20070317
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; NICKEL BASE ALLOYS; WELDED JOINTS; MICROSTRUCTURE; OXIDATION; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; IRON ALLOYS; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; YTTRIUM ALLOYS; Oxidation; Weld; NiCrFeAlY; EPMA; Internal Oxidation

Citation Formats

Pint, Bruce A, and Paul, Larry D. OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF WELDED AND BASE METAL UNS N06025. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Pint, Bruce A, & Paul, Larry D. OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF WELDED AND BASE METAL UNS N06025. United States.
Pint, Bruce A, and Paul, Larry D. Mon . "OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF WELDED AND BASE METAL UNS N06025". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_931294,
title = {OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF WELDED AND BASE METAL UNS N06025},
author = {Pint, Bruce A and Paul, Larry D.},
abstractNote = {The oxidation behavior of specimens containing tungsten inert gas welds of UNS N06025 (NiCrFeAlY) was investigated in air for up to 5,000h at 900 -1000 C and 1,000h at 1100 -1200 C. In general, the microstructure was very homogeneous in the weld with smaller carbides and the Al2O3 penetrations were similar or smaller compared to those formed in the base metal. Above 1000 C, significant spallation was observed and Al and Cr depletion in the metal was observed to a similar extent in the weld and base metal. The maximum internal oxidation depth of the base metal at 900 and 1100 C was lower than several other commercial Ni-base alloys.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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