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Title: A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a rich history of significant contributions to geospatial science spanning the past four decades. In the early years, work focused on basic research, such as development of algorithms for processing geographic data and early use of LANDSAT imagery. The emphasis shifted in the mid-1970s to development of geographic information system (GIS) applications to support programs such as the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), and later to issue-oriented GIS applications supporting programs such as environmental restoration and management (mid-1980s through present). Throughout this period, the DOE national laboratories represented a strong chorus of voices advocating the importance of geospatial science and technology in the decades to come. The establishment of a Geospatial Science Program by the DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2005 reflects the continued potential of geospatial science to enhance DOE's science, projects, and operations, as is well demonstrated by historical analysis.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
930963
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Map & Geography Libraries (Geoscapes); Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; US DOE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; GEOGRAPHY; GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Bhaduri, Budhendra L. A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Bhaduri, Budhendra L. A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy. United States.
Bhaduri, Budhendra L. Mon . "A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_930963,
title = {A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy},
author = {Bhaduri, Budhendra L},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a rich history of significant contributions to geospatial science spanning the past four decades. In the early years, work focused on basic research, such as development of algorithms for processing geographic data and early use of LANDSAT imagery. The emphasis shifted in the mid-1970s to development of geographic information system (GIS) applications to support programs such as the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), and later to issue-oriented GIS applications supporting programs such as environmental restoration and management (mid-1980s through present). Throughout this period, the DOE national laboratories represented a strong chorus of voices advocating the importance of geospatial science and technology in the decades to come. The establishment of a Geospatial Science Program by the DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2005 reflects the continued potential of geospatial science to enhance DOE's science, projects, and operations, as is well demonstrated by historical analysis.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Map & Geography Libraries (Geoscapes)},
number = 1,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Abstract not provided.
  • For many decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been a leader in basic scientific and engineering research that utilizes geospatial science to advance the state of knowledge in disciplines impacting national security, energy sustainability, and environmental stewardship. DOE recently established a comprehensive Geospatial Science Program that will provide an enterprise geographic information system infrastructure connecting all elements of DOE to critical geospatial data and associated geographic information services (GIServices). The Geospatial Science Program will provide a common platform for enhanced scientific and technical collaboration across DOE's national laboratories and facilities.
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