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Title: Laser Interference Metallurgy - using interference as a tool for micro/nano structuring

Abstract

Interfering laser beams of a high-power pulsed laser provide the opportunity of applying a direct lateral interaction with the surface microstructure of metals in micro/nanoscale based on photo-thermal nature mechanisms. This "Laser interference metallurgy" allows the creation of periodic patterns of features with a well defined long-range order on metallic surfaces at the scale of typical microstructures (from the sub micrometer level up to micrometers). This technique is an approach to initiate metallurgical processes such as melting, recrystallization, recovery, and defect and phase formation in the lateral scale of the microstructure itself and with an additional long range order given by the interference periodicity. In this work, the laser interference theory is described and used to calculate multi-beam interference patterns. A method to calculate the numbers of laser beams as well as the geometrical arrangement of the beams to obtain a desired periodical pattern prior to experiments is presented. The formation of long-range-ordered intermetallic compounds as well as macroscopic and microscopic variations of mechanical properties on structured metallic thin films are presented as examples.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Saarland University, Saarbrucken, Germany
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
ORNL other overhead
OSTI Identifier:
930954
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Materials Research; Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; METALS; INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; LASER RADIATION; INTERFERENCE; METALLURGY; MICROSTRUCTURE; TEXTURE; FABRICATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

M�cklich, Frank, Lasagni, Andres Fabian, and Daniel, Claus. Laser Interference Metallurgy - using interference as a tool for micro/nano structuring. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.3139/146.101375.
M�cklich, Frank, Lasagni, Andres Fabian, & Daniel, Claus. Laser Interference Metallurgy - using interference as a tool for micro/nano structuring. United States. doi:10.3139/146.101375.
M�cklich, Frank, Lasagni, Andres Fabian, and Daniel, Claus. Sun . "Laser Interference Metallurgy - using interference as a tool for micro/nano structuring". United States. doi:10.3139/146.101375.
@article{osti_930954,
title = {Laser Interference Metallurgy - using interference as a tool for micro/nano structuring},
author = {M�cklich, Frank and Lasagni, Andres Fabian and Daniel, Claus},
abstractNote = {Interfering laser beams of a high-power pulsed laser provide the opportunity of applying a direct lateral interaction with the surface microstructure of metals in micro/nanoscale based on photo-thermal nature mechanisms. This "Laser interference metallurgy" allows the creation of periodic patterns of features with a well defined long-range order on metallic surfaces at the scale of typical microstructures (from the sub micrometer level up to micrometers). This technique is an approach to initiate metallurgical processes such as melting, recrystallization, recovery, and defect and phase formation in the lateral scale of the microstructure itself and with an additional long range order given by the interference periodicity. In this work, the laser interference theory is described and used to calculate multi-beam interference patterns. A method to calculate the numbers of laser beams as well as the geometrical arrangement of the beams to obtain a desired periodical pattern prior to experiments is presented. The formation of long-range-ordered intermetallic compounds as well as macroscopic and microscopic variations of mechanical properties on structured metallic thin films are presented as examples.},
doi = {10.3139/146.101375},
journal = {International Journal of Materials Research},
number = 10,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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