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Title: Nanoprecipitates in Steels

Abstract

The creep strength of ferritic steels can be substantially improved by the incorporation of a high number density of nano-scale dispersoids. Examples for such alloys are the oxide dispersion strengthened steels MA956, MA957, and PM2000. The dispersoids in these steels contain Y and Ti, or Y and Al. They can be as small as a few nanometers in size. Processing is traditionally carried out by mechanical alloying of elemental or pre-alloyed powders mixed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The goal of the present research is to identify alternative ways of producing ultrafine dispersoids. One possible way is internal oxidation, in which reactive elements dissolved in a metallic matrix are selectively oxidized. Internal oxidation experiments were carried out with Fe-Y, Fe-Ti-Y, and Fe-Al-Y precursors. Microstructural analysis showed that dispersoid dimensions as small as 10 nm could be achieved. Atomized Fe-0.25 at% Y powder was internally oxidized and consolidated by hot forging. An increase in the high-temperature creep strength by {approx} 20% was observed. Since it is likely that the composition of the precursor alloys is crucial for maximizing the number density and thermal stability of the oxides, experiments allowing the rapid screening of different compositions have been initiated.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shared Research Equipment Collaborative Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
FE USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
930930
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 21st Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials, Knoxville, TN, USA, 20070430, 20070502
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; CREEP; DIMENSIONS; FERRITIC STEELS; FORGING; OXIDATION; OXIDES; PRECURSOR; PROCESSING; STABILITY; STEELS

Citation Formats

Schneibel, Joachim H, Lu, Zhao Ping, and Shim, Sang Hoon. Nanoprecipitates in Steels. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Schneibel, Joachim H, Lu, Zhao Ping, & Shim, Sang Hoon. Nanoprecipitates in Steels. United States.
Schneibel, Joachim H, Lu, Zhao Ping, and Shim, Sang Hoon. Mon . "Nanoprecipitates in Steels". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_930930,
title = {Nanoprecipitates in Steels},
author = {Schneibel, Joachim H and Lu, Zhao Ping and Shim, Sang Hoon},
abstractNote = {The creep strength of ferritic steels can be substantially improved by the incorporation of a high number density of nano-scale dispersoids. Examples for such alloys are the oxide dispersion strengthened steels MA956, MA957, and PM2000. The dispersoids in these steels contain Y and Ti, or Y and Al. They can be as small as a few nanometers in size. Processing is traditionally carried out by mechanical alloying of elemental or pre-alloyed powders mixed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The goal of the present research is to identify alternative ways of producing ultrafine dispersoids. One possible way is internal oxidation, in which reactive elements dissolved in a metallic matrix are selectively oxidized. Internal oxidation experiments were carried out with Fe-Y, Fe-Ti-Y, and Fe-Al-Y precursors. Microstructural analysis showed that dispersoid dimensions as small as 10 nm could be achieved. Atomized Fe-0.25 at% Y powder was internally oxidized and consolidated by hot forging. An increase in the high-temperature creep strength by {approx} 20% was observed. Since it is likely that the composition of the precursor alloys is crucial for maximizing the number density and thermal stability of the oxides, experiments allowing the rapid screening of different compositions have been initiated.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Nanoscale Cu rich precipitates (CRPs) are widely believed to be the dominant hardening feature resulting in severe embrittlement in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. However, this view has recently been challenged by interpretations of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) measurements that describe the dominant nanofeatures as dilute solute atmospheres (DSAs). The practical impact of these differing views is very significant. This work compares and contrasts the CRP versus DSA descriptions to a wide variety of pertinent data. Mechanical property trends as well as small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) measurements supportmore » the presence of CRPs. CRPs are also consistent with the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic laws. However, standard theory cannot provide the atomic level resolution needed to fully understand the nanofeatures. Therefore, a new Lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) atomistic method is used to simulate the complex chemical structures of the CRPs. The LMC method unifies the SANS/FEGSTEM and APFIM data within a well founded physical framework.« less
  • The creep strength of ferritic steels can be substantially improved by the incorporation of a high number density of nano-scale dispersoids. Examples for such alloys are the oxide dispersion strengthened steels MA956, MA957, and PM2000. The dispersoids in these steels contain Y and Ti, or Y and Al. They can be as small as a few nanometers in size. Processing is traditionally carried out by mechanical alloying of elemental or pre-alloyed powders mixed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The goal of the present research is to identify alternative ways of producing ultrafine dispersoids. One possible way is internal oxidation, inmore » which reactive elements dissolved in a metallic matrix are selectively oxidized. Internal oxidation experiments were carried out with Fe-Y, Fe-Ti-Y, and Fe-Al-Y precursors. Microstructural analysis showed that dispersoid dimensions as small as 10 nm could be achieved. Atomized Fe-0.25 at% Y powder was internally oxidized and consolidated by hot forging. An increase in the high-temperature creep strength by {approx} 20% was observed. Since it is likely that the composition of the precursor alloys is crucial for maximizing the number density and thermal stability of the oxides, experiments allowing the rapid screening of different compositions have been initiated.« less
  • Abstract not provided.