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Title: Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability

Abstract

Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with pre-harvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. USDA Forest Service
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
930917
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biomass & Bioenergy; Journal Issue: 31
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AVAILABILITY; CARBON; COTTONWOODS; CROPS; FERTILIZATION; GENOTYPE; IRRIGATION; NUTRIENTS; PINES; ROTATION; SAVANNAH RIVER; SOILS; SYCAMORES; TREES; WATER; Soil carbon; sequestration

Citation Formats

Sanchez, Felipe G., Coleman, Mark, Garten Jr, Charles T, Luxmoore, Robert J, Stanturf, J. A., Trettin, Carl, and Wullschleger, Stan D. Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.biombioe.2007.06.002.
Sanchez, Felipe G., Coleman, Mark, Garten Jr, Charles T, Luxmoore, Robert J, Stanturf, J. A., Trettin, Carl, & Wullschleger, Stan D. Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability. United States. doi:10.1016/j.biombioe.2007.06.002.
Sanchez, Felipe G., Coleman, Mark, Garten Jr, Charles T, Luxmoore, Robert J, Stanturf, J. A., Trettin, Carl, and Wullschleger, Stan D. Mon . "Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability". United States. doi:10.1016/j.biombioe.2007.06.002.
@article{osti_930917,
title = {Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability},
author = {Sanchez, Felipe G. and Coleman, Mark and Garten Jr, Charles T and Luxmoore, Robert J and Stanturf, J. A. and Trettin, Carl and Wullschleger, Stan D},
abstractNote = {Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with pre-harvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.biombioe.2007.06.002},
journal = {Biomass & Bioenergy},
number = 31,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments.more » At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.« less
  • Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the threemore » techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.« less
  • Determined sediment and nutrient losses resulting from converting cropland to short rotation woody crops at research sites in Mississippi and Tennessee.
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