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Title: Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices

Abstract

Herein is discussed the instrumentation and control requirements for achieving the goal of operating multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in parallel to regulate local voltage. The process for establishing the flexible laboratory control and data acquisition system that allows for the integration of multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in XXXX Laboratory's Distributed Energy - Communications and Controls Laboratory (DECC) is discussed. The DE devices control local distribution system voltage through dynamic reactive power production. Although original efforts were made to control the reactive power (RP) output using information from commercially available meters specifically designed for monitoring and analyzing electric power values, these "intelligent" meters did not provide the flexibility needed. A very flexible and capable real-time monitoring and control system was selected after the evaluation of various methods of data acquisition (DAQ) and control. The purpose of this paper is to describe the DAQ and controls system development. The chosen controller is a commercially available real-time controller from dSPACE. This controller has many excellent features including a very easy programming platform through Simulink and Matlab's Real Time Workshop. The dSPACE system proved to provide both the flexibility and expandability needed to integrate and control the RP producing devices under consideration.more » The desire was to develop controls with this flexible laboratory instrumentation and controls setup that could be eventually be included in an embedded controller on a DE device. Some experimental results are included that clearly show that some functional control strategies are currently being tested.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cooling, Heating and Power Integration Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
OE USDOE - Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution
OSTI Identifier:
930845
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Industrial Technology; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUPPLIES; COMPUTERIZED CONTROL SYSTEMS; DESIGN; ON-LINE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS; DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEMS; VOLTAGE REGULATORS; Distributed Energy; Reactive Power; Real-Time Instrumentation & Control

Citation Formats

Foster, Jason, Rizy, D Tom, and Kueck, John D. Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Foster, Jason, Rizy, D Tom, & Kueck, John D. Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices. United States.
Foster, Jason, Rizy, D Tom, and Kueck, John D. Mon . "Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_930845,
title = {Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices},
author = {Foster, Jason and Rizy, D Tom and Kueck, John D},
abstractNote = {Herein is discussed the instrumentation and control requirements for achieving the goal of operating multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in parallel to regulate local voltage. The process for establishing the flexible laboratory control and data acquisition system that allows for the integration of multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in XXXX Laboratory's Distributed Energy - Communications and Controls Laboratory (DECC) is discussed. The DE devices control local distribution system voltage through dynamic reactive power production. Although original efforts were made to control the reactive power (RP) output using information from commercially available meters specifically designed for monitoring and analyzing electric power values, these "intelligent" meters did not provide the flexibility needed. A very flexible and capable real-time monitoring and control system was selected after the evaluation of various methods of data acquisition (DAQ) and control. The purpose of this paper is to describe the DAQ and controls system development. The chosen controller is a commercially available real-time controller from dSPACE. This controller has many excellent features including a very easy programming platform through Simulink and Matlab's Real Time Workshop. The dSPACE system proved to provide both the flexibility and expandability needed to integrate and control the RP producing devices under consideration. The desire was to develop controls with this flexible laboratory instrumentation and controls setup that could be eventually be included in an embedded controller on a DE device. Some experimental results are included that clearly show that some functional control strategies are currently being tested.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Industrial Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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