skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Laboratory Calibration of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for the Solar-B Satellite

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930599
Report Number(s):
BNL-80890-2008-JA
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics-OT; Journal Volume: 45
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Lang,C., Kent, B., Paulstian, W., Brown, C., Keyser, C., Anderson, M., Case, G., Chaudry, R., James, A., and et al. Laboratory Calibration of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for the Solar-B Satellite. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.45.008689.
Lang,C., Kent, B., Paulstian, W., Brown, C., Keyser, C., Anderson, M., Case, G., Chaudry, R., James, A., & et al. Laboratory Calibration of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for the Solar-B Satellite. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.45.008689.
Lang,C., Kent, B., Paulstian, W., Brown, C., Keyser, C., Anderson, M., Case, G., Chaudry, R., James, A., and et al. Sun . "Laboratory Calibration of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for the Solar-B Satellite". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.45.008689.
@article{osti_930599,
title = {Laboratory Calibration of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer for the Solar-B Satellite},
author = {Lang,C. and Kent, B. and Paulstian, W. and Brown, C. and Keyser, C. and Anderson, M. and Case, G. and Chaudry, R. and James, A. and et al.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1364/AO.45.008689},
journal = {Applied Optics-OT},
number = ,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The laboratory end-to-end testing of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) for the Solar-B satellite is reported. A short overview of the EIS, which observes in two bands in the extreme-ultraviolet wavelength range, is given. The calibration apparatus is described, including details of the light sources used.The data reduction and analysis procedure are outlined. The wavelength calibration using a Penning source to illuminate the aperture fully is presented. We discuss the aperture determination using a radiometrically calibrated hollow-cathode-based source. We then give an account of the predicted and measured efficiencies from consideration of the efficiencies of individual optical elements in firstmore » order, an account of efficiencies out of band when radiation incident in one band is detected in the other, and efficiencies in multiple orders. The efficiencies measured in first order for in band and out of band are compared with the predictions and the sensitivity, and its uncertainties are derived. Application of the radiometric calibration is discussed.« less
  • The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) is the first of a new generation of normal-incidence, two-optical-element spectroscopic instruments developed for space solar extreme-ultraviolet astronomy. The instrument is currently mounted on the Solar-B satellite for a planned launch in late 2006. The instrument observes in two spectral bands, 170-210 {angstrom} and 250-290 {angstrom}. The spectrograph geometry and grating prescription were optimized to obtain excellent imaging while still maintaining readily achievable physical and fabrication tolerances. A refined technique using low ruling density surrogate gratings and optical metrology was developed to align the instrument with visible light. Slit rasters of the solar surface aremore » obtained by mechanically tilting the mirror. A slit exchange mechanism allows selection among four slits at the telescope focal plane. Each slit is precisely located at the focal plane. The spectrograph imaging performance was optically characterized in the laboratory. The resolution was measured using the Mg iii and Ne iii lines in the range of 171-200 {angstrom}. The He ii line at 256 {angstrom} and Ne iii lines were used in the range of 251-284 {angstrom}. The measurements demonstrate an equivalent resolution of 2 arc sec on the solar surface, in good agreement with the predicted performance. We describe the EIS optics, mechanisms, and measured performance.« less
  • We report on the absolute sensitivity calibration of an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer system that is frequently employed to study emission from short-pulse laser experiments. The XUV spectrometer, consisting of a toroidal mirror and a transmission grating, was characterized at a synchrotron source in respect of the ratio of the detected to the incident photon flux at photon energies ranging from 15.5 eV to 99 eV. The absolute calibration allows the determination of the XUV photon number emitted by laser-based XUV sources, e.g., high-harmonic generation from plasma surfaces or in gaseous media. We have demonstrated high-harmonic generation in gases andmore » plasma surfaces providing 2.3 {mu}W and {mu}J per harmonic using the respective generation mechanisms.« less
  • The entire profile of the Fe XXIII line at 263.8 A, formed at temperature Almost-Equal-To 14 MK, was blueshifted by an upward velocity -122 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1} when it was first detected by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (11.18 s) stare mode during a C1 solar flare. The entire profile became even more blueshifted over the next two exposures, when the upward velocity reached its maximum of -208 {+-} 14 km s{sup -1} before decreasing to zero over the next 12 exposures. After that, a weak, secondary blueshifted component appeared for five exposures, reached amore » maximum upward velocity of -206 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1}, and disappeared after the maximum line intensity (stationary plus blueshifted) was achieved. Velocities were measured relative to the intense stationary profile observed near the flare's peak and early during its decline. The initial episode during which the entire profile was blueshifted lasted about 156 s, while the following episode during which a secondary blueshifted component was detected lasted about 56 s. The first episode likely corresponds to chromospheric evaporation in a single loop strand, while the second corresponds to evaporation in an additional strand, as described in multi-strand flare loop models proposed by Hori et al. and Warren and Doschek. Line emission from progressively cooler ions (Fe XVII, XVI, and XIV) brightened at successively later times, consistent with cooling of flare-heated plasma.« less