skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase

Abstract

Chlorella virus DNA ligase, the smallest eukaryotic ligase known, has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function, despite having none of the accessory domains found in cellular ligases. A 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Chlorella virus ligase-AMP intermediate bound to duplex DNA containing a 3'-OH-5'-PO{sub 4} nick reveals a new mode of DNA envelopment, in which a short surface loop emanating from the OB domain forms a {beta}-hairpin 'latch' that inserts into the DNA major groove flanking the nick. A network of interactions with the 3'-OH and 5'-PO{sub 4} termini in the active site illuminates the DNA adenylylation mechanism and the crucial roles of AMP in nick sensing and catalysis. Addition of a divalent cation triggered nick sealing in crystallo, establishing that the nick complex is a bona fide intermediate in the DNA repair pathway.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930529
Report Number(s):
BNL-80554-2008-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1545-9993; TRN: US200904%%770
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Structural and Molecular Biology; Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CATALYSIS; CATIONS; CHLORELLA; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DNA; DNA REPAIR; LIGASES; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Nair,P., Nandakumar, J., Smith, P., Odell, M., Lima, C., and Shuman, S.. Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1038/nsmb1266.
Nair,P., Nandakumar, J., Smith, P., Odell, M., Lima, C., & Shuman, S.. Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase. United States. doi:10.1038/nsmb1266.
Nair,P., Nandakumar, J., Smith, P., Odell, M., Lima, C., and Shuman, S.. Mon . "Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase". United States. doi:10.1038/nsmb1266.
@article{osti_930529,
title = {Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase},
author = {Nair,P. and Nandakumar, J. and Smith, P. and Odell, M. and Lima, C. and Shuman, S.},
abstractNote = {Chlorella virus DNA ligase, the smallest eukaryotic ligase known, has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function, despite having none of the accessory domains found in cellular ligases. A 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Chlorella virus ligase-AMP intermediate bound to duplex DNA containing a 3'-OH-5'-PO{sub 4} nick reveals a new mode of DNA envelopment, in which a short surface loop emanating from the OB domain forms a {beta}-hairpin 'latch' that inserts into the DNA major groove flanking the nick. A network of interactions with the 3'-OH and 5'-PO{sub 4} termini in the active site illuminates the DNA adenylylation mechanism and the crucial roles of AMP in nick sensing and catalysis. Addition of a divalent cation triggered nick sealing in crystallo, establishing that the nick complex is a bona fide intermediate in the DNA repair pathway.},
doi = {10.1038/nsmb1266},
journal = {Nature Structural and Molecular Biology},
number = 8,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the Cdk2 inhibitor p27(Kip1) plays a central role in cell cycle progression, and enhanced degradation of p27(Kip1) is associated with many common cancers. Proteolysis of p27(Kip1) is triggered by Thr187 phosphorylation, which leads to the binding of the SCF(Skp2) (Skp1-Cul1-Rbx1-Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Unlike other known SCF substrates, p27(Kip1) ubiquitination also requires the accessory protein Cks1. The crystal structure of the Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complex bound to a p27(Kip1) phosphopeptide shows that Cks1 binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain and C-terminal tail of Skp2, whereas p27(Kip1) binds to both Cks1 and Skp2. The phosphorylated Thr187 side chainmore » of p27(Kip1) is recognized by a Cks1 phosphate binding site, whereas the side chain of an invariant Glu185 inserts into the interface between Skp2 and Cks1, interacting with both. The structure and biochemical data support the proposed model that Cdk2-cyclin A contributes to the recruitment of p27(Kip1) to the SCF(Skp2)-Cks1 complex.« less
  • The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the Cdk2 inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} plays a central role in cell cycle progression, and enhanced degradation of p27{sup Kip1} is associated with many common cancers. Proteolysis of p27{sup Kip1} is triggered by Thr187 phosphorylation, which leads to the binding of the SCF{sup Skp2} (Skp1-Cul1-Rbx1-Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Unlike other known SCF substrates, p27{sup Kip1} ubiquitination also requires the accessory protein Cks1. The crystal structure of the Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complex bound to a p27{sup Kip1} phosphopeptide shows that Cks1 binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain and C-terminal tail of Skp2, whereas p27{sup Kip1} binds to both Cks1more » and Skp2. The phosphorylated Thr187 side chain of p27{sup Kip1} is recognized by a Cks1 phosphate binding site, whereas the side chain of an invariant Glu185 inserts into the interface between Skp2 and Cks1, interacting with both. The structure and biochemical data support the proposed model that Cdk2-cyclin A contributes to the recruitment of p27{sup Kip1} to the SCF{sup Skp2}-Cks1 complex.« less
  • EDD (or HYD) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the family of HECT (homologous to E6-AP C terminus) ligases. EDD contains an N-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, which is present in a variety of proteins involved in ubiquitin-mediated processes. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), NMR titrations, and pull-down assays to show that the EDD UBA domain binds ubiquitin. The 1.85{angstrom} crystal structure of the complex with ubiquitin reveals the structural basis of ubiquitin recognition by UBA helices {alpha}1 and {alpha}3. The structure shows a larger number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds than observed in previous UBA/ubiquitin complexes. Two of thesemore » involve ordered water molecules. The functional importance of residues at the UBA/ubiquitin interface was confirmed using site-directed mutagenesis. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements show that the EDD UBA domain does not have a strong preference for polyubiquitin chains over monoubiquitin. This suggests that EDD binds to monoubiquitinated proteins, which is consistent with its involvement in DNA damage repair pathways.« less
  • The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formationmore » of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.« less
  • The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formationmore » of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.« less