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Title: Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, Escherichia coli NikR

Abstract

Studies of the transcriptional repression of the Ni-specific permease encoded by the P{sub nik} operon by Escherichia coli NikR using a LacZ reporter assay establish that the NikR response is specific to nickel in vivo. Toward understanding this metal ion-specific response, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of various M-NikR complexes (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I), and Zn(II)) was used to show that each high-affinity binding site metal adopts a unique structure, with Ni(II) and Cu(II) being the only two metal ions to feature planar four-coordinate complexes. The results are consistent with an allosteric mechanism whereby the geometry and ligand selection of the metal present in the high-affinity site induce a unique conformation in NikR that subsequently influences DNA binding. The influence of the high-affinity metal on protein structure was examined using hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Each NikR complex gives rise to differing amounts of H/D exchange; Zn(II)- and Co(II)-NikR are most like apo-NikR, while the exchange time course is substantially different for Ni(II) and to a lesser extent for Cu(II). In addition to the high-affinity metal binding site, E. coli NikR has a low-affinity metal-binding site that affects DNA binding affinity. Wemore » have characterized this low-affinity site using XAS in heterobimetallic complexes of NikR. When Cu(II) occupies the high-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the low-affinity site, the Ni K-edge XAS spectra show that the Ni site is composed of six N/O-donors. A similar low-affinity site structure is found for the NikR complex when Co(II) occupies the low-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the high-affinity site, except that one of the Co(II) ligands is a chloride derived from the buffer.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930361
Report Number(s):
BNL-81080-2008-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7863; JACSAT; TRN: US200904%%651
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Chemical Society; Journal Volume: 129
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; AFFINITY; CHLORIDES; DNA; ESCHERICHIA COLI; IN VIVO; IONIZATION; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; NICKEL; PROTEIN STRUCTURE; SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Leitch,S., Bradley, M., Rowe, J., Chivers, P., and Maroney, M. Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, Escherichia coli NikR. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/ja068505y.
Leitch,S., Bradley, M., Rowe, J., Chivers, P., & Maroney, M. Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, Escherichia coli NikR. United States. doi:10.1021/ja068505y.
Leitch,S., Bradley, M., Rowe, J., Chivers, P., and Maroney, M. Mon . "Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, Escherichia coli NikR". United States. doi:10.1021/ja068505y.
@article{osti_930361,
title = {Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, Escherichia coli NikR},
author = {Leitch,S. and Bradley, M. and Rowe, J. and Chivers, P. and Maroney, M.},
abstractNote = {Studies of the transcriptional repression of the Ni-specific permease encoded by the P{sub nik} operon by Escherichia coli NikR using a LacZ reporter assay establish that the NikR response is specific to nickel in vivo. Toward understanding this metal ion-specific response, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of various M-NikR complexes (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I), and Zn(II)) was used to show that each high-affinity binding site metal adopts a unique structure, with Ni(II) and Cu(II) being the only two metal ions to feature planar four-coordinate complexes. The results are consistent with an allosteric mechanism whereby the geometry and ligand selection of the metal present in the high-affinity site induce a unique conformation in NikR that subsequently influences DNA binding. The influence of the high-affinity metal on protein structure was examined using hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Each NikR complex gives rise to differing amounts of H/D exchange; Zn(II)- and Co(II)-NikR are most like apo-NikR, while the exchange time course is substantially different for Ni(II) and to a lesser extent for Cu(II). In addition to the high-affinity metal binding site, E. coli NikR has a low-affinity metal-binding site that affects DNA binding affinity. We have characterized this low-affinity site using XAS in heterobimetallic complexes of NikR. When Cu(II) occupies the high-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the low-affinity site, the Ni K-edge XAS spectra show that the Ni site is composed of six N/O-donors. A similar low-affinity site structure is found for the NikR complex when Co(II) occupies the low-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the high-affinity site, except that one of the Co(II) ligands is a chloride derived from the buffer.},
doi = {10.1021/ja068505y},
journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
number = ,
volume = 129,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Studies of the transcriptional repression of the Ni-specific permease encoded by the Pnik operon by Escherichia coli NikR using a LacZ reporter assay establish that the NikR response is specific to nickel in vivo. Toward understanding this metal ion-specific response, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of various M-NikR complexes (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I), and Zn(II)) was used to show that each high-affinity binding site metal adopts a unique structure, with Ni(II) and Cu(II) being the only two metal ions to feature planar four-coordinate complexes. The results are consistent with an allosteric mechanism whereby the geometry and ligand selectionmore » of the metal present in the high-affinity site induce a unique conformation in NikR that subsequently influences DNA binding. The influence of the high-affinity metal on protein structure was examined using hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Each NikR complex gives rise to differing amounts of H/D exchange; Zn(II)- and Co(II)-NikR are most like apo-NikR, while the exchange time course is substantially different for Ni(II) and to a lesser extent for Cu(II). In addition to the high-affinity metal binding site, E. coli NikR has a low-affinity metal-binding site that affects DNA binding affinity. We have characterized this low-affinity site using XAS in heterobimetallic complexes of NikR. When Cu(II) occupies the high-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the low-affinity site, the Ni K-edge XAS spectra show that the Ni site is composed of six N/O-donors. A similar low-affinity site structure is found for the NikR complex when Co(II) occupies the low-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the high-affinity site, except that one of the Co(II) ligands is a chloride derived from the buffer.« less
  • Escherichia coli NikR regulates cellular nickel uptake by binding to the nik operon in the presence of nickel and blocking transcription of genes encoding the nickel uptake transporter. NikR has two binding affinities for the nik operon: a nanomolar dissociation constant with stoichiometric nickel and a picomolar dissociation constant with excess nickel [Bloom, S. L., and Zamble, D. B. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 10029-10038; Chivers, P. T., and Sauer, R. T. (2002) Chem. Biol. 9, 1141-1148]. While it is known that the stoichiometric nickel ions bind at the NikR tetrameric interface [Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10,more » 794-799; Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 13676-13681], the binding sites for excess nickel ions have not been fully described. Here we have determined the crystal structure of NikR in the presence of excess nickel to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution and have obtained nickel anomalous data (1.4845 {angstrom}) in the presence of excess nickel for both NikR alone and NikR cocrystallized with a 30-nucleotide piece of double-stranded DNA containing the nik operon. These anomalous data show that excess nickel ions do not bind to a single location on NikR but instead reveal a total of 22 possible low-affinity nickel sites on the NikR tetramer. These sites, for which there are six different types, are all on the surface of NikR, and most are found in both the NikR alone and NikR-DNA structures. Using a combination of crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations, the nickel sites can be described as preferring octahedral geometry, utilizing one to three protein ligands (typically histidine) and at least two water molecules.« less
  • The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and location at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin, and MraW is known to methylate ribosomal RNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable growth phenotype in any species tested to date, hampering progress in understanding their physiological role. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ perturbs cell division and the cell envelope, is more lethal at high levels or in minimal growth medium,more » and that MraW antagonizes these effects. MraZGFP localizes to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Indeed, purified MraZ directly binds a region upstream from its own promoter containing three direct repeats to regulate its own expression and that of downstream cell division and cell wall genes. MraZ-LacZ fusions are repressed by excess MraZ but not when DNA binding by MraZ is inhibited. RNAseq analysis indicates that MraZ is a global transcriptional regulator with numerous targets in addition to dcw genes. One of these targets, mioC, is directly bound by MraZ in a region with three direct repeats.« less
  • Escherichia coli RcnR (resistance to cobalt and nickel regulator, EcRcnR) is a metal-responsive repressor of the genes encoding the Ni(II) and Co(II) exporter proteins RcnAB by binding to PRcnAB. The DNA binding affinity is weakened when the cognate ions Ni(II) and Co(II) bind to EcRcnR in a six-coordinate site that features a (N/O)5S ligand donor-atom set in distinct sites: while both metal ions are bound by the N terminus, Cys35, and His64, Co(II) is additionally bound by His3. On the other hand, the noncognate Zn(II) and Cu(I) ions feature a lower coordination number, have a solvent-accessible binding site, and coordinatemore » protein ligands that do not include the N-terminal amine. A molecular model of apo-EcRcnR suggested potential roles for Glu34 and Glu63 in binding Ni(II) and Co(II) to EcRcnR. The roles of Glu34 and Glu63 in metal binding, metal selectivity, and function were therefore investigated using a structure/function approach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to assess the structural changes in the Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) binding sites of Glu → Ala and Glu → Cys variants at both positions. The effect of these structural alterations on the regulation of PrcnA by EcRcnR in response to metal binding was explored using LacZ reporter assays. These combined studies indicate that while Glu63 is a ligand for both metal ions, Glu34 is a ligand for Co(II) but possibly not for Ni(II). The Glu34 variants affect the structure of the cognate metal sites, but they have no effect on the transcriptional response. In contrast, the Glu63 variants affect both the structure and transcriptional response, although they do not completely abolish the function of EcRcnR. The structure of the Zn(II) site is not significantly perturbed by any of the glutamic acid variations. The spectroscopic and functional data obtained on the mutants were used to calculate models of the metal-site structures of EcRcnR bound to Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II). The results are interpreted in terms of a switch mechanism, in which a subset of the metal-binding ligands is responsible for the allosteric response required for DNA release.« less