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Title: Cation-Dependent Compression Behavior in Low-Silica Zeolite-X

Abstract

Under hydrostatic pressure, low-silica zeolite-X exhibits a range of compression behavior depending on its cation distribution as well as the pressure transmitting medium. This pressure response appears to be a complex phenomenon involving the interplay between selective overhydration, cation relocation, as well as the intrinsic framework distortion, and indicates that the apparent compressibility of LSX can be tailored via cation exchange and the choice of pressure medium.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930359
Report Number(s):
BNL-81078-2008-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7863; JACSAT; TRN: US200904%%525
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Chemical Society; Journal Volume: 129
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COMPRESSIBILITY; COMPRESSION; HYDROSTATICS; ZEOLITES; CATIONS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Lee,Y., Lee, H., Lee, D., Shin, T., Choi, J., and Kao, C. Cation-Dependent Compression Behavior in Low-Silica Zeolite-X. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/ja0710961.
Lee,Y., Lee, H., Lee, D., Shin, T., Choi, J., & Kao, C. Cation-Dependent Compression Behavior in Low-Silica Zeolite-X. United States. doi:10.1021/ja0710961.
Lee,Y., Lee, H., Lee, D., Shin, T., Choi, J., and Kao, C. Mon . "Cation-Dependent Compression Behavior in Low-Silica Zeolite-X". United States. doi:10.1021/ja0710961.
@article{osti_930359,
title = {Cation-Dependent Compression Behavior in Low-Silica Zeolite-X},
author = {Lee,Y. and Lee, H. and Lee, D. and Shin, T. and Choi, J. and Kao, C.},
abstractNote = {Under hydrostatic pressure, low-silica zeolite-X exhibits a range of compression behavior depending on its cation distribution as well as the pressure transmitting medium. This pressure response appears to be a complex phenomenon involving the interplay between selective overhydration, cation relocation, as well as the intrinsic framework distortion, and indicates that the apparent compressibility of LSX can be tailored via cation exchange and the choice of pressure medium.},
doi = {10.1021/ja0710961},
journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
number = ,
volume = 129,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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