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Title: The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77

Abstract

The cleavage-stimulation factor (CstF) is required for the cleavage of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structure determination of the 77 kDa subunit of the murine CstF complex (CstF-77), it was serendipitously discovered that a solution infected by a fungus was crucial for the crystallization of this protein. CstF-77 was partially proteolyzed during crystallization; this was very likely to have been catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. It was found that the fungal protease can be replaced by subtilisin and this in situ proteolysis protocol produced crystals of sufficient size for structural studies. After an extensive search, it was found that 55% glucose can be used as a cryoprotectant while maintaining the diffraction quality of the crystals; most other commonly used cryoprotectants were detrimental to the diffraction quality.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930333
Report Number(s):
BNL-81044-2008-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1744-3091; TRN: US200904%%627
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Acta Crystallographica Section F: Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications; Journal Volume: 63
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CLEAVAGE; CRYSTALS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALLIZATION; DIFFRACTION; GLUCOSE; MESSENGER-RNA; PROTEINS; PROTEOLYSIS; RODENTS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Bai,Y., Auperin, T., and Tong, L.. The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1107/S1744309107002904.
Bai,Y., Auperin, T., & Tong, L.. The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77. United States. doi:10.1107/S1744309107002904.
Bai,Y., Auperin, T., and Tong, L.. Mon . "The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77". United States. doi:10.1107/S1744309107002904.
@article{osti_930333,
title = {The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77},
author = {Bai,Y. and Auperin, T. and Tong, L.},
abstractNote = {The cleavage-stimulation factor (CstF) is required for the cleavage of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structure determination of the 77 kDa subunit of the murine CstF complex (CstF-77), it was serendipitously discovered that a solution infected by a fungus was crucial for the crystallization of this protein. CstF-77 was partially proteolyzed during crystallization; this was very likely to have been catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. It was found that the fungal protease can be replaced by subtilisin and this in situ proteolysis protocol produced crystals of sufficient size for structural studies. After an extensive search, it was found that 55% glucose can be used as a cryoprotectant while maintaining the diffraction quality of the crystals; most other commonly used cryoprotectants were detrimental to the diffraction quality.},
doi = {10.1107/S1744309107002904},
journal = {Acta Crystallographica Section F: Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications},
number = ,
volume = 63,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Cleavage stimulation factor (CstF) is a heterotrimeric protein complex essential for polyadenylation of mRNA precursors. The 77 kDa subunit, CstF-77, is known to mediate interactions with the other two subunits of CstF as well as with other components of the polyadenylation machinery. We report here the crystal structure of the HAT (half a TPR) domain of murine CstF-77, as well as its C-terminal subdomain. Structural and biochemical studies show that the HAT domain consists of two subdomains, HAT-N and HAT-C domains, with drastically different orientations of their helical motifs. The structures reveal a highly elongated dimer, spanning 165 {angstrom}, withmore » the dimerization mediated by the HAT-C domain. Light-scattering studies, yeast two-hybrid assays, and analytical ultracentrifugation measurements confirm this self-association. The mode of dimerization and the relative arrangement of the HAT-N and HAT-C domains are unique to CstF-77. Our data support a role for CstF dimerization in pre-mRNA 3' end processing.« less
  • The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted bymore » the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.« less
  • Proteolysis in situ by a protease secreted by a contaminating fungus is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3′-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion ofmore » an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.« less
  • A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with 10 proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates thatmore » are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization.« less