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Title: A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions

Abstract

Synchrotron FTIR can provide high spatial resolution (<10 {mu}m pixel size) in situ biochemical analyses of intact biotissues, an area of increasing importance in the post-genomic era, as gene functions and gene networks are coming under direct scrutiny. With this technique, we can simultaneously assess multiple aspects of cell biochemistry and cytoplasmic composition. In this paper, we report the first results of our synchrotron FTIR examination of hyphae of three important fungal model systems, each with sequenced genomes and a wealth of research: Aspergillus, Neurospora, and Rhizopus. We have analyzed the FTIR maps of Aspergillus nidulans cells containing the hypA1 allele, a well-characterized single-gene temperature-sensitive morphogenetic mutation. The hypA1 cells resemble wildtype at 28 {sup o}C but have growth defects at 42 {sup o}C. We have also investigated Neurospora and Rhizopus cultures grown in media with optimal or elevated pH. Significant differences between the spectra of the three fungi are likely related to differences in composition and structure. In addition, high spatial resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy provides an outstanding method for monitoring subtle subcellular changes that accompany environmental stress.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930052
Report Number(s):
BNL-80678-2008-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1618-2642; TRN: US0806694
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry; Journal Volume: 387; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ASPERGILLUS; AUGMENTATION; BIOCHEMISTRY; DEFECTS; FUNCTIONS; FUNGI; GENES; GROWTH; MAPS; MONITORING; NEUROSPORA; RHIZOPUS; SIZE; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; SYNCHROTRONS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Szeghalmi,A., Kaminskyj, S., and Gough, K. A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s00216-006-0850-2.
Szeghalmi,A., Kaminskyj, S., & Gough, K. A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions. United States. doi:10.1007/s00216-006-0850-2.
Szeghalmi,A., Kaminskyj, S., and Gough, K. Mon . "A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions". United States. doi:10.1007/s00216-006-0850-2.
@article{osti_930052,
title = {A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions},
author = {Szeghalmi,A. and Kaminskyj, S. and Gough, K.},
abstractNote = {Synchrotron FTIR can provide high spatial resolution (<10 {mu}m pixel size) in situ biochemical analyses of intact biotissues, an area of increasing importance in the post-genomic era, as gene functions and gene networks are coming under direct scrutiny. With this technique, we can simultaneously assess multiple aspects of cell biochemistry and cytoplasmic composition. In this paper, we report the first results of our synchrotron FTIR examination of hyphae of three important fungal model systems, each with sequenced genomes and a wealth of research: Aspergillus, Neurospora, and Rhizopus. We have analyzed the FTIR maps of Aspergillus nidulans cells containing the hypA1 allele, a well-characterized single-gene temperature-sensitive morphogenetic mutation. The hypA1 cells resemble wildtype at 28 {sup o}C but have growth defects at 42 {sup o}C. We have also investigated Neurospora and Rhizopus cultures grown in media with optimal or elevated pH. Significant differences between the spectra of the three fungi are likely related to differences in composition and structure. In addition, high spatial resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy provides an outstanding method for monitoring subtle subcellular changes that accompany environmental stress.},
doi = {10.1007/s00216-006-0850-2},
journal = {Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry},
number = 5,
volume = 387,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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