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Title: Comparison of the Distributions of Bromine, Lead and Zinc in Tooth and Bone from an Ancient Peruvian Burial site by X-ray Fluorescence

Abstract

Synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence was used to study the distribution of selected trace elements (Zn, Pb, and Br) in tooth and bone samples obtained from an individual from a pre-Columbian archaeological site (Cabur) located on the north coast of Peru. The results show that Zn, Pb, and Br are present in both the teeth and bone samples and that the Zn and Pb seem to be confined to similar regions (cementum and periostium), while Br shows a novel distribution with enrichment close to the Haversian canals and (or) in regions that appear to be Ca deficient.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
930037
Report Number(s):
BNL-80655-2008-JA
TRN: US0806691
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Canadian Journal of Chemistry/Revue Canadiene de Chimie; Journal Volume: 85
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES; BROMINE; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; ENRICHMENT; FLUORESCENCE; LEAD; PERU; SKELETON; SYNCHROTRONS; TEETH; TRACE AMOUNTS; ZINC; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Martin,R., Naftel, S., Nelson, A., and Sapp, W.. Comparison of the Distributions of Bromine, Lead and Zinc in Tooth and Bone from an Ancient Peruvian Burial site by X-ray Fluorescence. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1139/V07-100.
Martin,R., Naftel, S., Nelson, A., & Sapp, W.. Comparison of the Distributions of Bromine, Lead and Zinc in Tooth and Bone from an Ancient Peruvian Burial site by X-ray Fluorescence. United States. doi:10.1139/V07-100.
Martin,R., Naftel, S., Nelson, A., and Sapp, W.. Mon . "Comparison of the Distributions of Bromine, Lead and Zinc in Tooth and Bone from an Ancient Peruvian Burial site by X-ray Fluorescence". United States. doi:10.1139/V07-100.
@article{osti_930037,
title = {Comparison of the Distributions of Bromine, Lead and Zinc in Tooth and Bone from an Ancient Peruvian Burial site by X-ray Fluorescence},
author = {Martin,R. and Naftel, S. and Nelson, A. and Sapp, W.},
abstractNote = {Synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence was used to study the distribution of selected trace elements (Zn, Pb, and Br) in tooth and bone samples obtained from an individual from a pre-Columbian archaeological site (Cabur) located on the north coast of Peru. The results show that Zn, Pb, and Br are present in both the teeth and bone samples and that the Zn and Pb seem to be confined to similar regions (cementum and periostium), while Br shows a novel distribution with enrichment close to the Haversian canals and (or) in regions that appear to be Ca deficient.},
doi = {10.1139/V07-100},
journal = {Canadian Journal of Chemistry/Revue Canadiene de Chimie},
number = ,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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