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Title: Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is unusual among bacteria in possessing a eukaryotic-like system for N-linked protein glycosylation at Asn residues in sequons of the type Asp/Glu-Xaa-Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr. However, little is known about the structural context of the glycosylated sequons, limiting the design of novel recombinant glycoproteins. To obtain more information on sequon structure, we have determined the crystal structure of the PEB3 (Cj0289c) dimer. PEB3 has the class II periplasmic-binding protein fold, with each monomer having two domains with a ligand-binding site containing citrate located between them, and overall resembles molybdate- and sulfate-binding proteins. The sequon around Asn90 is located within a surface-exposed loop joining two structural elements. The three key residues are well exposed on the surface; hence, they may be accessible to the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase in the folded state.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
929902
Report Number(s):
BNL-80487-2008-JA
TRN: US200822%%1077
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Protein Science; Journal Volume: 16
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BACTERIA; CITRATES; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DESIGN; ELEMENTS; GLYCOPROTEINS; JOINING; MONOMERS; PROTEINS; RESIDUES; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Rangarajan,E., Bhatia, S., Watson, D., Munger, C., Cygler, M., Matte, A., and Young, N. Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1110/ps.062737507.
Rangarajan,E., Bhatia, S., Watson, D., Munger, C., Cygler, M., Matte, A., & Young, N. Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni. United States. doi:10.1110/ps.062737507.
Rangarajan,E., Bhatia, S., Watson, D., Munger, C., Cygler, M., Matte, A., and Young, N. Mon . "Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni". United States. doi:10.1110/ps.062737507.
@article{osti_929902,
title = {Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni},
author = {Rangarajan,E. and Bhatia, S. and Watson, D. and Munger, C. and Cygler, M. and Matte, A. and Young, N.},
abstractNote = {Campylobacter jejuni is unusual among bacteria in possessing a eukaryotic-like system for N-linked protein glycosylation at Asn residues in sequons of the type Asp/Glu-Xaa-Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr. However, little is known about the structural context of the glycosylated sequons, limiting the design of novel recombinant glycoproteins. To obtain more information on sequon structure, we have determined the crystal structure of the PEB3 (Cj0289c) dimer. PEB3 has the class II periplasmic-binding protein fold, with each monomer having two domains with a ligand-binding site containing citrate located between them, and overall resembles molybdate- and sulfate-binding proteins. The sequon around Asn90 is located within a surface-exposed loop joining two structural elements. The three key residues are well exposed on the surface; hence, they may be accessible to the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase in the folded state.},
doi = {10.1110/ps.062737507},
journal = {Protein Science},
number = ,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterium that uses flagella for motility and causes worldwide acute gastroenteritis in humans. The C. jejuni N-acetyltransferase PseH (cjPseH) is responsible for the third step in flagellin O-linked glycosylation and plays a key role in flagellar formation and motility. cjPseH transfers an acetyl group from an acetyl donor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to the amino group of UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-N-acetyl-β-L-altrosamine to produce UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-L-altropyranose. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of cjPseH, crystal structures of cjPseH alone and in complex with AcCoA were determined at 1.95 Å resolution. cjPseH folds into a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by four α-helicesmore » with two continuously connected grooves. A deep groove (groove-A) accommodates the AcCoA molecule. Interestingly, the acetyl end of AcCoA points toward an open space in a neighboring shallow groove (groove-S), which is occupied by extra electron density that potentially serves as a pseudosubstrate, suggesting that the groove-S may provide a substrate-binding site. Structure-based comparative analysis suggests that cjPseH utilizes a unique catalytic mechanism of acetylation that has not been observed in other glycosylation-associated acetyltransferases. Thus, our studies on cjPseH will provide valuable information for the design of new antibiotics to treat C. jejuni-induced gastroenteritis. - Highlights: • cjPseH adopts a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by α-helices. • cjPseH features two continuously connected grooves on the protein surface. • Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) binds into a deep groove of cjPseH in an ‘L’ shape. • The acetyl end of AcCoA points to a wide groove, a potential substrate-binding site.« less
  • PEB3 is a glycoprotein adhesin from Campylobacter jejuni whose structure suggested a role in transport. We have investigated potential ligands for PEB3 and characterized their binding properties using biophysical methods in solution and by X-ray crystallography. A thermal aggregation assay of PEB3 with a library of physiological compounds identified three possible ligands [3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and aconitate], which stabilized wild-type PEB3 but did not stabilize either a PEB3 form containing two mutations at the ligand-binding site, T138A/S139A, or a second PEB3 mutant, K135E, at a site {approx}14 {angstrom} away. Fluorescence titration experiments and cocrystal structures with various ligands weremore » used to characterize the binding of 3-PG, PEP, and phosphate to PEB3. Further, a C. jejuni growth experiment in minimal medium supplemented with 3-PG showed that this molecule enhances the growth of wild-type C. jejuni, but not of the PEB3 mutants. Crystallographic analysis of PEB3 complexes revealed that the Ser171-Gln180 region in the presence of 3-PG or other phosphates is helical and similar to those of other transport proteins, but it is nonhelical when citrate is bound. The K135E mutation resulted in expression of a more highly glycosylated form of PEB3 in vivo, and its crystal structure showed the conformation of the first two residues of the glycan. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that PEB3 is a transport protein that may function in utilization of 3-PG or other phosphate-containing molecules from the host.« less
  • Campylobacter jejuni is highly unusual among bacteria in forming N-linked glycoproteins. The heptasaccharide produced by its pgl system is attached to protein Asn through its terminal 2, 4-diacetamido-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc (QuiNAc4NAc or N, N'-diacetylbacillosamine) moiety. The crucial, last part of this sugar's synthesis is the acetylation of UDP-2-acetamido-4-amino-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc by the enzyme PglD, with acetyl-CoA as a cosubstrate. We have determined the crystal structures of PglD in CoA-bound and unbound forms, refined to 1.8 and 1.75 Angstroms resolution, respectively. PglD is a trimer of subunits each comprised of two domains, an N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}-domain and a C-terminal left-handed {beta}-helix. Few structural differencesmore » accompany CoA binding, except in the C-terminal region following the {beta}-helix (residues 189-195), which adopts an extended structure in the unbound form and folds to extend the {beta}-helix upon binding CoA. Computational molecular docking suggests a different mode of nucleotide-sugar binding with respect to the acetyl-CoA donor, with the molecules arranged in an 'L-shape', compared with the 'in-line' orientation in related enzymes. Modeling indicates that the oxyanion intermediate would be stabilized by the NH group of Gly143', with His125' the most likely residue to function as a general base, removing H+ from the amino group prior to nucleophilic attack at the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-CoA. Site-specific mutations of active site residues confirmed the importance of His125', Glu124', and Asn118. We conclude that Asn118 exerts its function by stabilizing the intricate hydrogen bonding network within the active site and that Glu124' may function to increase the pKa of the putative general base, His125'.« less