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Title: Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.

Abstract

Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
929523
Report Number(s):
SAND2008-1020
TRN: US200822%%878
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ALGORITHMS; IMAGE PROCESSING; MOTION; RADAR; SEAS; SHIPS; Synthetic Aperture Radar.; Stability of ships.; Doppler radar.

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin Walter. Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/929523.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.. United States. doi:10.2172/929523.
Doerry, Armin Walter. 2008. "Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.". United States. doi:10.2172/929523. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/929523.
@article{osti_929523,
title = {Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.},
author = {Doerry, Armin Walter},
abstractNote = {Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.},
doi = {10.2172/929523},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:

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