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Title: Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

Abstract

An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; California Energy Commission
OSTI Identifier:
929480
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59724
Journal ID: CBUMEZ; R&D Project: EK264L; TRN: US200813%%207
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Construction and Building Materials; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 04/2008
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32; ACCELERATION; ALGAE; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COMBUSTION; CORROSION; CYANOBACTERIA; DECAY; DIFFUSION; FUNGI; HYDROCARBONS; MOISTURE; PLASTICS; SOOT; STAINS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; WEATHERING; WOOD

Citation Formats

Berdahl, Paul, Akbari, Hashem, Levinson, Ronnen, and Miller, William A. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Berdahl, Paul, Akbari, Hashem, Levinson, Ronnen, & Miller, William A. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview. United States.
Berdahl, Paul, Akbari, Hashem, Levinson, Ronnen, and Miller, William A. Thu . "Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/929480.
@article{osti_929480,
title = {Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview},
author = {Berdahl, Paul and Akbari, Hashem and Levinson, Ronnen and Miller, William A.},
abstractNote = {An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.},
doi = {},
journal = {Construction and Building Materials},
number = 4,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 30 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Mar 30 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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