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Title: Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in themarine actinomycete Salinispora tropica

Abstract

Recent fermentation studies have identified actinomycetes ofthe marine-dwelling genus Salinispora as prolific natural productproducers. To further evaluate their biosynthetic potential, we analyzedall identifiable secondary natural product gene clusters from therecently sequenced 5,184,724 bp S. tropica CNB-440 circular genome. Ouranalysis shows that biosynthetic potential meets or exceeds that shown byprevious Streptomyces genome sequences as well as other naturalproduct-producing actinomycetes. The S. tropica genome features ninepolyketide synthase systems of every known formally classified family,non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and several hybrid clusters. While afew clusters appear to encode molecules previously identified inStreptomyces species,the majority of the 15 biosynthetic loci are novel.Specific chemical information about putative and observed natural productmolecules is presented and discussed. In addition, our bioinformaticanalysis was critical for the structure elucidation of the novelpolyenemacrolactam salinilactam A. This study demonstrates the potentialfor genomic analysis to complement and strengthen traditional naturalproduct isolation studies and firmly establishes the genus Salinispora asa rich source of novel drug-like molecules.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
COLLABORATION - Scripps Institution ofOceanography
OSTI Identifier:
929322
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62942
R&D Project: 626882; BnR: KP1103010; TRN: US200813%%186
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 25; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: June 19,2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59; FERMENTATION; GENES; LIGASES; PEPTIDES; STREPTOMYCES

Citation Formats

Udwary, Daniel W., Zeigler, Lisa, Asolkar, Ratnakar, Singan,Vasanth, Lapidus, Alla, Fenical, William, Jensen, Paul R., and Moore, BradleyS. Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in themarine actinomycete Salinispora tropica. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Udwary, Daniel W., Zeigler, Lisa, Asolkar, Ratnakar, Singan,Vasanth, Lapidus, Alla, Fenical, William, Jensen, Paul R., & Moore, BradleyS. Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in themarine actinomycete Salinispora tropica. United States.
Udwary, Daniel W., Zeigler, Lisa, Asolkar, Ratnakar, Singan,Vasanth, Lapidus, Alla, Fenical, William, Jensen, Paul R., and Moore, BradleyS. Tue . "Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in themarine actinomycete Salinispora tropica". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/929322.
@article{osti_929322,
title = {Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in themarine actinomycete Salinispora tropica},
author = {Udwary, Daniel W. and Zeigler, Lisa and Asolkar, Ratnakar and Singan,Vasanth and Lapidus, Alla and Fenical, William and Jensen, Paul R. and Moore, BradleyS.},
abstractNote = {Recent fermentation studies have identified actinomycetes ofthe marine-dwelling genus Salinispora as prolific natural productproducers. To further evaluate their biosynthetic potential, we analyzedall identifiable secondary natural product gene clusters from therecently sequenced 5,184,724 bp S. tropica CNB-440 circular genome. Ouranalysis shows that biosynthetic potential meets or exceeds that shown byprevious Streptomyces genome sequences as well as other naturalproduct-producing actinomycetes. The S. tropica genome features ninepolyketide synthase systems of every known formally classified family,non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and several hybrid clusters. While afew clusters appear to encode molecules previously identified inStreptomyces species,the majority of the 15 biosynthetic loci are novel.Specific chemical information about putative and observed natural productmolecules is presented and discussed. In addition, our bioinformaticanalysis was critical for the structure elucidation of the novelpolyenemacrolactam salinilactam A. This study demonstrates the potentialfor genomic analysis to complement and strengthen traditional naturalproduct isolation studies and firmly establishes the genus Salinispora asa rich source of novel drug-like molecules.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences},
number = 25,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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