skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Fluorozirconate-based glass ceramic x-ray detectors for digital radiography.

Abstract

Two-dimensional indirect digital X-ray detectors use either a storage phosphor or a scintillator as an imaging plate. A storage phosphor forms a latent X-ray image, which is subsequently readout by a photostimulable luminescence process. A scintillator produces a visible image during X-ray illumination. Commercial storage-phosphor image plates have relatively poor spatial resolution because of light scattering during the readout. To improve their image resolution, europium (II)-doped fluorozirconate (FZ)-based glasses containing barium chloride nanoparticles have been developed. X-ray imaging showed that these storage-phosphor plates can resolve features as small as 17 {micro}m. By using appropriate thermal-processing conditions, the FZ-based glass ceramics can also be made into transparent glass ceramic scintillators. Imaging tests showed that these scintillators have a spatial resolution and efficiency comparable to those of a single-crystal CdWO{sub 4} scintillator. These results demonstrate that FZ-based glass ceramics are good candidates for digital radiography, either for storage phosphor or scintillator applications.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
929223
Report Number(s):
ANL/ET/CP-118761
TRN: US0804057
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiat. Meas.; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 4-5 ; Apr./May 2007; Conference: 6th European Conference on Luminescent Detectors and Transformers (LUMDETR 2006); Jun 19-23, 2006; Lviv, Ukraine
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; X-RAY DETECTION; RADIATION DETECTORS; ZIRCONATES; ORGANIC FLUORINE COMPOUNDS; BARIUM CHLORIDES; CERAMICS; DOPED MATERIALS; EUROPIUM; GLASS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; PHOSPHORS

Citation Formats

Schweizer, S., Johnson, J. A., Energy Technology, and Univ. of Paderborn. Fluorozirconate-based glass ceramic x-ray detectors for digital radiography.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.radmeas.2007.01.056.
Schweizer, S., Johnson, J. A., Energy Technology, & Univ. of Paderborn. Fluorozirconate-based glass ceramic x-ray detectors for digital radiography.. United States. doi:10.1016/j.radmeas.2007.01.056.
Schweizer, S., Johnson, J. A., Energy Technology, and Univ. of Paderborn. Sun . "Fluorozirconate-based glass ceramic x-ray detectors for digital radiography.". United States. doi:10.1016/j.radmeas.2007.01.056.
@article{osti_929223,
title = {Fluorozirconate-based glass ceramic x-ray detectors for digital radiography.},
author = {Schweizer, S. and Johnson, J. A. and Energy Technology and Univ. of Paderborn},
abstractNote = {Two-dimensional indirect digital X-ray detectors use either a storage phosphor or a scintillator as an imaging plate. A storage phosphor forms a latent X-ray image, which is subsequently readout by a photostimulable luminescence process. A scintillator produces a visible image during X-ray illumination. Commercial storage-phosphor image plates have relatively poor spatial resolution because of light scattering during the readout. To improve their image resolution, europium (II)-doped fluorozirconate (FZ)-based glasses containing barium chloride nanoparticles have been developed. X-ray imaging showed that these storage-phosphor plates can resolve features as small as 17 {micro}m. By using appropriate thermal-processing conditions, the FZ-based glass ceramics can also be made into transparent glass ceramic scintillators. Imaging tests showed that these scintillators have a spatial resolution and efficiency comparable to those of a single-crystal CdWO{sub 4} scintillator. These results demonstrate that FZ-based glass ceramics are good candidates for digital radiography, either for storage phosphor or scintillator applications.},
doi = {10.1016/j.radmeas.2007.01.056},
journal = {Radiat. Meas.},
number = 4-5 ; Apr./May 2007,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The authors have designed and evaluated a novel design of line array x-ray detector for use with digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) systems. The Radiographic Line Scan (RLS) detector is less than half the cost of discrete multi-channel line array detectors, yet provides the potential for resolution to less than 25 {micro}m at energies of 420 kV. The RLS detector consists of a scintillator fiber-optically coupled to a thermo-electrically cooled line array CCD. Gadolinium oxysulfide screen material has been used as the scintillator, in thicknesses up to 250 {micro}m. Scintillating glass, which is formed into a fiber opticmore » bundle, has also been used in thicknesses up to 2 mm. The large 2.5 mm by 25 {micro}m CCD cells provide high dynamic range while preserving high resolution; the 2.5 mm dimension is oriented in the x-ray absorption direction while the 25 {micro}m dimension is oriented in the resolution direction. Servo controlled thermo-electric cooling of the CCD to a fixed temperature provides reduction of dark current and stabilization of the output. Greater dynamic range is achieved by reducing the dark current, while output stabilization reduces the need for frequent calibration of the detector. Measured performance characteristics are presented along with DR and CT images produced using the RLS detector.« less
  • Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) research are being conducted at large laser facilities, such as the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). At such facilities, millimeter-sized targets with micrometer structures are studied in a variety of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, equation-of-state, inertial confinement fusion and high-energy density experiments. The extreme temperatures and pressures achieved in these experiments make the results susceptible to imperfections in the fabricated targets. Targets include materials varying widely in composition ({approx}3 < Z < {approx}82), density ({approx}0.03 tomore » {approx}20 g/cm{sup 3}), geometry (planar to spherical) and embedded structures (joints to subassemblies). Fabricating these targets with structures to the tolerances required is a challenging engineering problem the ICF and HEDP community are currently undertaking. Nondestructive characterization (NDC) provides a valuable tool in material selection, component inspection, and the final pre-shot assemblies inspection. X-rays are a key method used to NDC these targets. In this paper we discuss X-ray attenuation, X-ray phase effects, and the X-ray system used, its performance and application to characterize low-temperature Raleigh-Taylor and non-cryogenic double-shell targets.« less