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Title: A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in atunnel

Abstract

Understanding microclimate dynamics in tunnels is importantfor designing and maintaining underground facilities. For example, in thegeological disposal of radioactive materials, condensation of vaporshould be minimized as it can accelerate waste package corrosion andradionuclide release. While microclimate dynamics are known to bedominated by the advection of heat and moisture, additional factors mayalso be important, such as the presence of fractures or faults. Wepresent a relatively inexpensive method to assess microclimaticperturbations within a tunnel. By combining standard temperature andrelative humidity sensors with low-cost sensors designed to detectchanges in condensation, we monitored microclimate dynamics along atunnel at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.We observed significant differences in the pattern of condensation in afaulted zone relative to that of a nonfaulted zone, suggesting that themicroclimate dynamics of excavated cavities in fractured, partiallysaturated rocks can be highly complex.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.Waste Management System
OSTI Identifier:
929047
Report Number(s):
LBNL-63049
Journal ID: ISSN 0899-8418; IJCLEU; R&D Project: G60691; BnR: DF0961000; TRN: US0803455
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Climatology; Journal Volume: DOI: 10.1002/joc; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2008
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; ADVECTION; CAVITIES; CORROSION; FRACTURES; HUMIDITY; MICROCLIMATES; MOISTURE; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOISOTOPES; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES; WASTES; YUCCA MOUNTAIN; Microclimate Tunnels Condensation Evaporation Fractured RockMonitoring Techniques

Citation Formats

Salve, R., and Kowalsky, M.B. A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in atunnel. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Salve, R., & Kowalsky, M.B. A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in atunnel. United States.
Salve, R., and Kowalsky, M.B. Thu . "A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in atunnel". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/929047.
@article{osti_929047,
title = {A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in atunnel},
author = {Salve, R. and Kowalsky, M.B.},
abstractNote = {Understanding microclimate dynamics in tunnels is importantfor designing and maintaining underground facilities. For example, in thegeological disposal of radioactive materials, condensation of vaporshould be minimized as it can accelerate waste package corrosion andradionuclide release. While microclimate dynamics are known to bedominated by the advection of heat and moisture, additional factors mayalso be important, such as the presence of fractures or faults. Wepresent a relatively inexpensive method to assess microclimaticperturbations within a tunnel. By combining standard temperature andrelative humidity sensors with low-cost sensors designed to detectchanges in condensation, we monitored microclimate dynamics along atunnel at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.We observed significant differences in the pattern of condensation in afaulted zone relative to that of a nonfaulted zone, suggesting that themicroclimate dynamics of excavated cavities in fractured, partiallysaturated rocks can be highly complex.},
doi = {},
journal = {International Journal of Climatology},
number = ,
volume = DOI: 10.1002/joc,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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