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Title: A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil

Abstract

To facilitate investigations of moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil, we have developed a technique to qualitatively monitorpatterns of saturation changes. Field results suggest that this device,the sensor array system (SAS), is suitable for determining changes inrelative wetness along vertical soil profiles. The performance of theseprobes was compared with that of the time domain reflectometry (TDR)technique under controlled and field conditions. Measurements from bothtechniques suggest that by obtaining data at high spatial and temporalresolution, the SAS technique was effective in determining patterns ofsaturation changes along a soil profile. In addition, hardware used inthe SAS technique was significantly cheaper than the TDR system, and thesensor arrays were much easier to install along a soilprofile.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
929025
Report Number(s):
LBNL-63351
Journal ID: ISSN 0361-5995; SSSJD4; R&D Project: G72162; BnR: YN1901000; TRN: US200812%%586
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soil Science Society of America Journal; Journal Volume: 0; Journal Issue: 0; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 0
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; MOISTURE; MONITORING; MONITORS; PERFORMANCE; PROBES; RESOLUTION; SATURATION; SOILS; SAS sensor array system TDR time domain reflectrometry OD outerdiameter PVC polyvinyl chloride

Citation Formats

Salve, R., and Cook, P.J. A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Salve, R., & Cook, P.J. A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil. United States.
Salve, R., and Cook, P.J. Tue . "A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/929025.
@article{osti_929025,
title = {A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil},
author = {Salve, R. and Cook, P.J.},
abstractNote = {To facilitate investigations of moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil, we have developed a technique to qualitatively monitorpatterns of saturation changes. Field results suggest that this device,the sensor array system (SAS), is suitable for determining changes inrelative wetness along vertical soil profiles. The performance of theseprobes was compared with that of the time domain reflectometry (TDR)technique under controlled and field conditions. Measurements from bothtechniques suggest that by obtaining data at high spatial and temporalresolution, the SAS technique was effective in determining patterns ofsaturation changes along a soil profile. In addition, hardware used inthe SAS technique was significantly cheaper than the TDR system, and thesensor arrays were much easier to install along a soilprofile.},
doi = {},
journal = {Soil Science Society of America Journal},
number = 0,
volume = 0,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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