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Title: BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code

Abstract

The program was tasked with implementing time dependent analysis of charges particles into an existing finite element code with adaptive meshing, called Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA). BOA was initially funded by a DOE Phase II program to use the finite element method with adaptive meshing to track particles in unstructured meshes. It uses modern programming techniques, state-of-the-art data structures, so that new methods, features and capabilities are easily added and maintained. This Phase II program was funded to implement plasma simulations in BOA and extend its capabilities to model thermal electrons, secondary emissions, self magnetic field and implement a more comprehensive post-processing and feature-rich GUI. The program was successful in implementing thermal electrons, secondary emissions, and self magnetic field calculations. The BOA GUI was also upgraded significantly, and CCR is receiving interest from the microwave tube and semiconductor equipment industry for the code. Implementation of PIC analysis was partially successful. Computational resource requirements for modeling more than 2000 particles begin to exceed the capability of most readily available computers. Modern plasma analysis typically requires modeling of approximately 2 million particles or more. The problem is that tracking many particles in an unstructured mesh that is adapting becomes inefficient. In particularmore » memory requirements become excessive. This probably makes particle tracking in unstructured meshes currently unfeasible with commonly available computer resources. Consequently, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. is exploring hybrid codes where the electromagnetic fields are solved on the unstructured, adaptive mesh while particles are tracked on a fixed mesh. Efficient interpolation routines should be able to transfer information between nodes of the two meshes. If successfully developed, this could provide high accuracy and reasonable computational efficiency.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Calabazas Creek Research, Inc.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
928978
Report Number(s):
Final Report
TRN: US1102875
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-03ER83616
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCURACY; BEAM OPTICS; COMPUTERS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; ELECTRONS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; IMPLEMENTATION; INTERPOLATION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MICROWAVE TUBES; PLASMA; PLASMA SIMULATION; PROGRAMMING; SECONDARY EMISSION; SIMULATION; STREAMS; particle in cell, PIC finite element, charged particle analysis. computer simulation, electromagnetic simulation

Citation Formats

Thuc Bui. BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/928978.
Thuc Bui. BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code. United States. doi:10.2172/928978.
Thuc Bui. Thu . "BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code". United States. doi:10.2172/928978. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/928978.
@article{osti_928978,
title = {BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code},
author = {Thuc Bui},
abstractNote = {The program was tasked with implementing time dependent analysis of charges particles into an existing finite element code with adaptive meshing, called Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA). BOA was initially funded by a DOE Phase II program to use the finite element method with adaptive meshing to track particles in unstructured meshes. It uses modern programming techniques, state-of-the-art data structures, so that new methods, features and capabilities are easily added and maintained. This Phase II program was funded to implement plasma simulations in BOA and extend its capabilities to model thermal electrons, secondary emissions, self magnetic field and implement a more comprehensive post-processing and feature-rich GUI. The program was successful in implementing thermal electrons, secondary emissions, and self magnetic field calculations. The BOA GUI was also upgraded significantly, and CCR is receiving interest from the microwave tube and semiconductor equipment industry for the code. Implementation of PIC analysis was partially successful. Computational resource requirements for modeling more than 2000 particles begin to exceed the capability of most readily available computers. Modern plasma analysis typically requires modeling of approximately 2 million particles or more. The problem is that tracking many particles in an unstructured mesh that is adapting becomes inefficient. In particular memory requirements become excessive. This probably makes particle tracking in unstructured meshes currently unfeasible with commonly available computer resources. Consequently, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. is exploring hybrid codes where the electromagnetic fields are solved on the unstructured, adaptive mesh while particles are tracked on a fixed mesh. Efficient interpolation routines should be able to transfer information between nodes of the two meshes. If successfully developed, this could provide high accuracy and reasonable computational efficiency.},
doi = {10.2172/928978},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 06 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Dec 06 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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