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Title: Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration

Abstract

The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Praxair Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
928837
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-01NT41147
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BOILERS; MEMBRANES; DESIGN; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; HEATERS; CARBON DIOXIDE; MATERIALS RECOVERY; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; OXYGEN; MEMBRANE TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Max Christie, Rick Victor, Bart van Hassel, Nagendra Nagabushana, Juan Li, Joseph Corpus, and Jamie Wilson. Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/928837.
Max Christie, Rick Victor, Bart van Hassel, Nagendra Nagabushana, Juan Li, Joseph Corpus, & Jamie Wilson. Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration. United States. doi:10.2172/928837.
Max Christie, Rick Victor, Bart van Hassel, Nagendra Nagabushana, Juan Li, Joseph Corpus, and Jamie Wilson. Sat . "Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration". United States. doi:10.2172/928837. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/928837.
@article{osti_928837,
title = {Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration},
author = {Max Christie and Rick Victor and Bart van Hassel and Nagendra Nagabushana and Juan Li and Joseph Corpus and Jamie Wilson},
abstractNote = {The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.},
doi = {10.2172/928837},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the third year of the program, January-December 2004, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The groundwork was laid for both the membrane materials development and the construction of the required facilities for testing the membrane reliability and performance. It has resulted in the construction of a single tube and multi-tube combustion test facility. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) principles were applied to the membrane material selection process. The required ceramic powdersmore » were ordered and will be evaluated in 2005. Design of experiment techniques (fuel gas mixture design) were applied to the membrane performance evaluation process. The first results indicate that the oxygen flux of the membrane is significantly higher when the porous support is exposed to the fuel gas mixture instead of air. Failures of the oxygen transport membrane tube did not occur during the reporting period which is supporting evidence that our emphasis on design for robustness is yielding the desired result. All work on the project was performed in a safe manner as proven by zero recordable injuries or lost work days.« less
  • This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the second year of the program, January-December 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes and confirmation of process economics, significant future progress is expected. Concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been investigated. OTM reactor combustion testing wasmore » delayed to insufficient reliability of the earlier OTM materials. Substantial improvements to reliability have been identified and testing will recommence early in 2004. Promising OTM material compositions and OTM architectures have been identified that improve the reliability of the ceramic elements. Economic evaluation continued. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton CO{sub 2}.« less
  • This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the third year of the program, January-December 2005, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management.
  • This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the first year of the program, January-December 2002, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes significant future progress is expected. A number of concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been proposed. A detailed modeling plan has been proposedmore » and early modeling work has focused on developing spreadsheet based models for quick engineering calculations. Combustion reactor laboratory scale evaluations efforts have been delayed due to the closing of Praxair's Tarrytown facility in December 2001. Experimental facilities and personnel have been relocated to Praxair's facility in Tonawanda. The facilities have recently been re-commissioned. Work with the OTM development task has also been delayed as early material selections were discarded. More recently, more promising OTM material compositions have been identified. Economic evaluation commenced. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton carbon.« less
  • Coal can support a large fraction of global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other candidate technologies, which propose long-term storage (e.g., ocean and geological sequestration), mineral sequestration permanently disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable mineral carbonates. Only benign, naturally occurring materials are formed, eliminating long-term storage and liability issues. Serpentine carbonation is a leading mineral sequestration process candidate, which offers large scale, permanent sequestration. Deposits exceed those needed to carbonate all the CO{sub 2} that could be generated from global coal reserves, and mining andmore » milling costs are reasonable ({approx}$4 to $5/ton). Carbonation is exothermic, providing exciting low-cost process potential. The remaining goal is to develop an economically viable process. An essential step in this development is increasing the carbonation reaction rate and degree of completion, without substantially impacting other process costs. Recently, the Albany Research Center (ARC) has accelerated serpentine carbonation, which occurs naturally over geological time, to near completion in less than an hour. While reaction rates for natural serpentine have been found to be too slow for practical application, both heat and mechanical (attrition grinding) pretreatment were found to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity. Unfortunately, these processes are too energy intensive to be cost-effective in their present form. In this project we explored the potential that utilizing power plant waste heat (e.g., available up to {approx}200-250 C) during mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) offers to enhance serpentine mineral carbonation, while reducing pretreatment energy consumption and process cost. This project was carried out in collaboration with the Albany Research Center (ARC) to maximize the insight into the potential thermomechanical activation offers. Lizardite was selected as the model serpentine material for investigation, due to the relative structural simplicity of its lamellar structure when compared with the corrugated and spiral structures of antigorite and chrysotile, respectively. Hot-ground materials were prepared as a function of grinding temperature, time, and intensity. Carbonation reactivity was explored using the standard ARC serpentine carbonation test (155 C, 150 atm CO{sub 2}, and 1 hr). The product feedstock and carbonation materials were investigated via a battery of techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal, BET, elemental, and infrared analysis. The incorporation of low-level heat with moderate mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) was found to be able to substantially enhance serpentine carbonation reactivity in comparison with moderate mechanical activation alone. Increases in the extent of carbonation of over 70% have been observed in this feasibility study, indicating thermomechanical activation offers substantial potential to lower process cost. Investigations of the thermomechanically activated materials that formed indicate adding low-level heat during moderately intense lizardite mechanical activation promotes (1) energy absorption during activation, (2) structural disorder, and (3) dehydroxylation, as well as carbonation reactivity, with the level of energy absorption, structural disorder and dehydroxylation generally increasing with increasing activation temperature. Increasing activation temperatures were also associated with decreasing surface areas and water absorptive capacities for the activated product materials. The above decreases in surface area and water absorption capacity can be directly correlated with enhanced particle sintering during thermomechanical activation, as evidenced by electron microscopy observation. The level of induced structural disorder appears to be a key parameter in enhancing carbonation reactivity. However, particle sintering may contribute to reduced reactivity. The effectiveness of thermomechanical activation at enhancing carbonation reactivity appears to be a complicated function of a variety of process parameters, including grinding intensity, feedstock-to-media ratio, time, temperature, etc.« less