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Title: The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensionalassays correlate with their profiles of gene expression

Abstract

3D cell cultures are rapidly becoming the method of choice for the physiologically relevant modeling of many aspects of non-malignant and malignant cell behavior ex vivo. Nevertheless, only a limited number of distinct cell types have been evaluated in this assay to date. Here we report the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles and 3D cell culture phenotypes of a substantial panel of human breast cancer cell lines. Each cell line adopts a colony morphology of one of four main classes in 3D culture. These morphologies reflect, at least in part, the underlying gene expression profile and protein expression patterns of the cell lines, and distinct morphologies were also associated with tumor cell invasiveness and with cell lines originating from metastases. We further demonstrate that consistent differences in genes encoding signal transduction proteins emerge when even tumor cells are cultured in 3D microenvironments.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Biological andEnvironmental Research
OSTI Identifier:
928779
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62407
R&D Project: 443180; BnR: KP1104010; TRN: US200811%%330
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Molecular Oncology; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 06/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60; CELL CULTURES; GENES; MAMMARY GLANDS; METASTASES; MORPHOLOGY; NEOPLASMS; PROTEINS; SIMULATION; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Kenny, Paraic A., Lee, Genee Y., Myers, Connie A., Neve, RichardM., Semeiks, Jeremy R., Spellman, Paul T., Lorenz, Katrin, Lee, Eva H., Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen, Petersen, Ole W., Gray, Joe W., and Bissell, MinaJ. The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensionalassays correlate with their profiles of gene expression. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.molonc.2007.02.004.
Kenny, Paraic A., Lee, Genee Y., Myers, Connie A., Neve, RichardM., Semeiks, Jeremy R., Spellman, Paul T., Lorenz, Katrin, Lee, Eva H., Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen, Petersen, Ole W., Gray, Joe W., & Bissell, MinaJ. The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensionalassays correlate with their profiles of gene expression. United States. doi:10.1016/j.molonc.2007.02.004.
Kenny, Paraic A., Lee, Genee Y., Myers, Connie A., Neve, RichardM., Semeiks, Jeremy R., Spellman, Paul T., Lorenz, Katrin, Lee, Eva H., Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen, Petersen, Ole W., Gray, Joe W., and Bissell, MinaJ. Wed . "The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensionalassays correlate with their profiles of gene expression". United States. doi:10.1016/j.molonc.2007.02.004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/928779.
@article{osti_928779,
title = {The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensionalassays correlate with their profiles of gene expression},
author = {Kenny, Paraic A. and Lee, Genee Y. and Myers, Connie A. and Neve, RichardM. and Semeiks, Jeremy R. and Spellman, Paul T. and Lorenz, Katrin and Lee, Eva H. and Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen and Petersen, Ole W. and Gray, Joe W. and Bissell, MinaJ.},
abstractNote = {3D cell cultures are rapidly becoming the method of choice for the physiologically relevant modeling of many aspects of non-malignant and malignant cell behavior ex vivo. Nevertheless, only a limited number of distinct cell types have been evaluated in this assay to date. Here we report the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles and 3D cell culture phenotypes of a substantial panel of human breast cancer cell lines. Each cell line adopts a colony morphology of one of four main classes in 3D culture. These morphologies reflect, at least in part, the underlying gene expression profile and protein expression patterns of the cell lines, and distinct morphologies were also associated with tumor cell invasiveness and with cell lines originating from metastases. We further demonstrate that consistent differences in genes encoding signal transduction proteins emerge when even tumor cells are cultured in 3D microenvironments.},
doi = {10.1016/j.molonc.2007.02.004},
journal = {Molecular Oncology},
number = 1,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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