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Title: On-site Analysis of Explosives in Various Matrices

Abstract

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed several different strategies and technologies for the on-site detection of explosives. These on-site detection techniques include a colorimetric test, thin layer chromatography (TLC) kit and portable gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The screening of suspicious containers on-site and the search for trace explosive residue in a post-blast forensic investigation are of great importance. For these reasons, LLNL's Forensic Science Center has developed a variety of fieldable detection technologies to screen for a wide range of explosives in various matrices and scenarios. Ideally, what is needed is a fast, accurate, easy-to-use, pocket-size and inexpensive field screening test for explosives.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
928200
Report Number(s):
UCRL-PROC-218505
TRN: US200815%%777
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: On-site Analysis of Explosives in Various Matrices, St. Petersburg, Russia, Sep 07 - Sep 08, 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CONTAINERS; CRIME DETECTION; DETECTION; EXPLOSIVES; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; MASS SPECTROMETERS; MATRICES; RESIDUES; SCREENS; THIN-LAYER CHROMATOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Reynolds, J G, Nunes, P, Whipple, R E, and Alcaraz, A. On-site Analysis of Explosives in Various Matrices. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Reynolds, J G, Nunes, P, Whipple, R E, & Alcaraz, A. On-site Analysis of Explosives in Various Matrices. United States.
Reynolds, J G, Nunes, P, Whipple, R E, and Alcaraz, A. Wed . "On-site Analysis of Explosives in Various Matrices". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/928200.
@article{osti_928200,
title = {On-site Analysis of Explosives in Various Matrices},
author = {Reynolds, J G and Nunes, P and Whipple, R E and Alcaraz, A},
abstractNote = {Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed several different strategies and technologies for the on-site detection of explosives. These on-site detection techniques include a colorimetric test, thin layer chromatography (TLC) kit and portable gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The screening of suspicious containers on-site and the search for trace explosive residue in a post-blast forensic investigation are of great importance. For these reasons, LLNL's Forensic Science Center has developed a variety of fieldable detection technologies to screen for a wide range of explosives in various matrices and scenarios. Ideally, what is needed is a fast, accurate, easy-to-use, pocket-size and inexpensive field screening test for explosives.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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