skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS)

Abstract

Regulation of bacterial spore solvent and solute permeability is a fundamental feature of dormancy but is poorly understood. Here we present a new technique, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) that allows the direct visualization and quantification of chemical gradients within spores. Using NanoSIMS, we demonstrate the penetration of water and a simple ionic salt, LiF, into the core of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) spores. The results demonstrate chemical gradients spanning the outer coat to the inner spore core that are driven by concentration-dependent ionic fluxes. Using deuterated water (D{sub 2}O), we have shown that external water is either retained or exchanged with water contained within the spore. Hydration and exchange are rapid, on a timescale of < 1 minute. Our results suggest a permeation mechanism by which short-time scale diffusion into and out of the spore can occur along hydration pathways. Additional studies are in progress to define the flux rates and mechanisms controlling these processes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
928184
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-217312
TRN: US200815%%770
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: American Chemical Society National Meeting, Atlanta, GA, United States, Mar 26 - Mar 30, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; BACILLUS; BACTERIAL SPORES; DIFFUSION; HYDRATION; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; PERMEABILITY; REGULATIONS; SOLUTES; SOLVENTS; SPORES; WATER

Citation Formats

Ghosal, S, Fallon, S, Leighton, T, Wheeler, K, Hutcheon, I, and Weber, P K. Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS). United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Ghosal, S, Fallon, S, Leighton, T, Wheeler, K, Hutcheon, I, & Weber, P K. Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS). United States.
Ghosal, S, Fallon, S, Leighton, T, Wheeler, K, Hutcheon, I, and Weber, P K. Thu . "Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/928184.
@article{osti_928184,
title = {Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS)},
author = {Ghosal, S and Fallon, S and Leighton, T and Wheeler, K and Hutcheon, I and Weber, P K},
abstractNote = {Regulation of bacterial spore solvent and solute permeability is a fundamental feature of dormancy but is poorly understood. Here we present a new technique, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) that allows the direct visualization and quantification of chemical gradients within spores. Using NanoSIMS, we demonstrate the penetration of water and a simple ionic salt, LiF, into the core of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) spores. The results demonstrate chemical gradients spanning the outer coat to the inner spore core that are driven by concentration-dependent ionic fluxes. Using deuterated water (D{sub 2}O), we have shown that external water is either retained or exchanged with water contained within the spore. Hydration and exchange are rapid, on a timescale of < 1 minute. Our results suggest a permeation mechanism by which short-time scale diffusion into and out of the spore can occur along hydration pathways. Additional studies are in progress to define the flux rates and mechanisms controlling these processes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 17 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Nov 17 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) by its parallel nature, generates complex and very large datasets quickly and easily. An example of such a large dataset is a spectral image where a complete spectrum is collected for each pixel. Unfortunately, the large size of the data matrix involved makes it difficult to extract the chemical information from the data using traditional techniques. Because time constraints prevent an analysis of every peak, prior knowledge is used to select the most probable and significant peaks for evaluation. However, this approach may lead to a misinterpretation of the system under analysis. Ideally, themore » complete spectral image would be used to provide a comprehensive, unbiased materials characterization based on full spectral signatures. Automated eXpert spectral image analysis (AXSIA) software developed at Sandia National Laboratories implements a multivariate curve resolution technique that was originally developed for energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) [Microsci. Microanal. 9 (2003) 1]. This paper will demonstrate the application of the method to TOF-SIMS. AXSIA distills complex and very large spectral image datasets into a limited number of physically realizable and easily interpretable chemical components, including both spectra and concentrations. The number of components derived during the analysis represents the minimum number of components needed to completely describe the chemical information in the original dataset. Since full spectral signatures are used to determine each component, an enhanced signal-to-noise is realized. The efficient statistical aggregation of chemical information enables small and unexpected features to be automatically found without user intervention.« less
  • Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Group III-nitride-arsenide materials were studied by SIMS, XRD, and Profiler to determine small amounts of nitrogen that can lower the alloys bandgap significantly.
  • Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is used to study the localization of heterocyclic amines in MCF7 line of human breast cancer cells. The detection sensitivities of a model rodent mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were determined. Following an established criteria for the determination of status of freeze-fracture cells, the distribution of PhIP in the MCF7 cells are reported.
  • The detection of chemical warfare agent residues on environmental surfaces is an important analytical activity because of the potential for proliferation of these weapons, and for environmental monitoring in areas where they are stored. Historically, one of the most widely used agents has been bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, also known as mustard gas and HD. It was initially used in combat in 1917; by the end of the First World War, more than 16% of all casualties were due to chemicals, in most cases mustard. Manufacture of mustard is continuing to this day; consequently, there are ongoing opportunities for exposure. 2-Chloroethyl ethylmore » sulfide (CEES) is used as a simulant for mustard (HD) in a study to develop secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for rapid, semi-quantitative detection of mustard on soil. Using SIMS with single stage mass spectrometry, a signature for CEES can be unequivocally observed only at the highest concentrations (0.1 monolayer and above). Selectivity and sensitivity are markedly improved employing multiple-stage mass spectrometry using an ion trap. C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SC{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} from CEES eliminates C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}S, which are highly diagnostic. CEES was detected at 0.0012 monolayer on soil. A single analysis could be conducted in under 5 minutes.« less
  • Corrosion of metals is an extremely important field with great economic and engineering implications at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. To effectively combat corrosion, one must understand the processes occurring. This paper shows the utility of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) data for elucidating the processes occurring in one particular corrosion process - the oxidation of uranium by water - and for validating a theoretical model. It had long been known that the oxidation of uranium by water is retarded by the presence of oxygen gas and the retardation has been assumed to occur by site blocking at the surface.more » However, when alternate isotopic exposures were made, followed by exposure to a mixture of /sup 16/O/sub 2/ and /sup 18/OH/sub 2/, the rapid exchange of /sup 16/O and /sup 18/O occurred in the oxide layer, but the further oxidation by water in this and subsequent exposures was retarded for up to 21 hours. This shows graphically that OH/sub 2/ is not held up at the surface and that the retarding mechanism is effective at the oxide/metal interface rather than at the surface. The effectiveness of the O/sub 2/ to retard the further water oxidation was much reduced if no water-formed oxide layer were present. The effectiveness was also crystallite related. 12 refs., 5 figs.« less